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FY2014 Residential Substance Abuse Treatment (RSAT) Programs Summary

Bill Johnson Correctional Center-Regimented Treatment Program

Bill Johnson Correctional Center is a 428 bed regimented treatment program providing substance abuse treatment designed around a therapeutic community model. BJCC uses a cognitive-behavioral approach for offenders assessed with a need for substance abuse treatment. Funding will continue salary and benefits for one staff member. This funding is to enhance the reentry program portion of the program which is otherwise supported by state funding. Aftercare for this program, which had been supported in part by Byrne grant, is now state funded. Funding will be used from July 1, 2013 to June 30, 2014.

Eddie Warrior Correctional Center-Regimented Treatment Program

EWCC offers a 6-9 month substance abuse program for females. The facility uses a renovated separate housing unit that holds 82 offenders. Focus of the treatment program is substance abuse treatment, cognitive restructuring education, physical fitness training, work programs, regimentation and structure. Upon completion of the program, graduates will proceed to vocational training or community reintegration and aftercare programs. Funds support two staff, supplies for therapeutic community and contracted substance abuse treatment. Funding will be used from July 1, 2013 to June 30, 2014.

Elk City Community Work Center

The Elk City Community Work Center is the site for two programs. The programs are designed to complement each other in regard to content and scheduling. The basic program provides substance abuse treatment for a maximum of 40 offenders who have been identified with a need for treatment. The program is between six to nine months in duration based on the individual need of the offender. A basic cognitive behavioral model is used to administer the substance abuse component of this program. The vocational education component is an apprenticeship program. The funding will provide supplies and professional service contracts for delivering the treatment component of the program through an agreement with the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services and the vocational apprentice program through agreement with Department of Career and Technology Education. Funds support the program coordinator that ensures quality treatment is provided at this program. Funding will be used from July 1, 2013 to June 30, 2014.

Lawton Community Corrections Center

This is a continuation of an existing program. The program is 6 - 9 months in length and accommodates approximately 20 offenders in a separate wing of the facility. A cognitive behavioral approach is used for this program. Relapse prevention, and reintegration are also key components. The program provides substance abuse treatment for offenders who have been identified with a need for intervention while they are at community-security level. The funding will provide a professional service contract for treatment providers through agreements with Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services from July 1, 2013 to June 30, 2014.

Mack Alford Correctional Center- Substance Abuse Treatment Program

This is a continuation of an existing program. The program is approximately 6 - 9 months in length and is cognitive behavioral in nature. Participants are housed in a separate 48-bed housing unit, which is occupied solely by offenders in treatment and graduates who participate in relapse prevention while remaining on the unit awaiting transfer to lower security or discharge. Funds are used for program materials and a professional service contract for treatment providers through agreements with Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services. Funding will be used from July 1, 2013 to June 30, 2014.

Mabel Bassett Minimum Unit -Substance Abuse Treatment Program

The Mabel Bassett Correctional Center in McLoud provides 44 beds for a residential treatment program for female offenders at minimum-security. Funding provides for an administrative program officer to provide services addressing criminal thinking, and a professional service contract for substance abuse treatment providers through an agreement with the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services. Funding will be used from July 1, 2013 to June 30, 2014.

William S. Key Correctional Center - Substance Abuse Treatment Program

This is a continuation of an existing program. A housing unit at this facility has been dedicated for a 164 bed residential substance abuse treatment program. Individual treatment plans are developed, with treatment services offered which range from nine months to one year. Funds are used for professional counselors, treatment materials and staff training. Funding will be used from July 1, 2013 to June 30, 2014.


All programs include use of the following program elements:

Assessment Instruments

Objective assessment instruments are used to guide the course of treatment and to facilitate the measurements of behavioral change.

In order to apply appropriate correctional interventions, it is necessary to identify the level of service needed to change negative behaviors. Two important factors of consideration for the appropriate level of service are the identification of the level of risk and need.

Identifying Risk

Risk factors refer to personal attributes and circumstances that are assessable prior to service and are predictive of future criminal behavior. Higher risk offenders benefit from more intensive services/supervision; lower risk offenders benefit from low (or no) levels of service.

Identifying Need

The need principle identifies criminogenic and noncriminogenic needs. Criminogenic needs are dynamic (changeable) attributes of the offender. When these attributes are changed, the probability of recidivism decreases.

Criminogenic Needs

  • Antisocial Behaviors
  • Antisocial Attitudes, Values, Beliefs
  • Antisocial Personality Characteristics
  • Antisocial Supports

Non-criminogenic needs are also dynamic and changeable, but these changes are not necessarily associated with the probability of reducing recidivism and are not addressed by RSAT funded Department of Corrections programs.

Non-criminogenic Needs

  • Low Self-esteem
  • Biological & Neurological Factors
  • Lower – Class Origins

Assessment Instrument for Identifying Risk/Need

Level of Service Inventory-Revised (LSI-R)
The Level of Service Inventory-Revised (LSI-R) measures risk and need across 10 different domains. Many of the 54 items that are measured by the LSI-R are considered dynamic, and thereby are subject to change through appropriate intervention.

The LSI-R will be administered to offenders upon entering the Oklahoma Department of Corrections Reception Center for the purpose of identifying the level of service that will match the risk/needs of the offender. When the level of service has been identified, the appropriate intervention may then be prescribed.

Alcohol and Other Drug (AOD) Assessments

Adult Substance Use Scale (ASUS)
The Adult Substance Use Scale (ASUS) is an adult alcohol and other drug self-report survey designed to assess an individual’s perceived alcohol and drug use in ten commonly defined categories. The instrument measures the degree of disruption that might result from the use of these drugs.

By summing the disruption scale score of the ASUS and the total score of the Level of Supervision Inventory-Revised (LSI-R) a proscribed level of treatment score may be obtained

Addiction Severity Index (ASI)
The Addiction Severity Index (ASI) is a structured clinical interview designed to collect information needed at intake into a program. The ASI assists the counseling staff developing an appropriate treatment plan for an individual in need of substance abuse treatment. The interview, which is typically conducted in less than 50 minutes, covers seven areas of life functioning.

Assessing Anti-social Attitudes

Research has established that many offenders possess attitudes and orientations that correlate highly with anti-social thinking and criminal behavior. In light of this evidence it is important to explore specifically how attitudes and orientations contribute to the negative behavior of substance abuse.

Responsivity Assessment Instruments

The responsivity principle suggests that clients should be assigned to those correctional interventions that are most able to meet their needs and style of learning. Individual characteristics may be personality type, intellectual functioning, maturity, stages of change, gender and/or ethnicity. Below are several of the instruments utilized to assess individual characteristics in an effort to better match treatment services with the offender. All facility programs utilize one or more of these assessments in developing a treatment track for the offender.

Self Rating at Intake and Evaluation of Self and Treatment
These assessments were developed by Texas Christian University’s Institute of Behavioral Research. They are used to obtain responsivity information in the areas of psychological functioning, social functioning, and treatment motivation. Additionally, these assessments can be used in a pre/post test fashion to measure change in offender’s attitudes and beliefs.

The Stages of Change Questionnaire
The Stages of Change Questionnaire places offenders into one of 6 stages of change. Those Stages of Change as they apply to addictive behaviors may range from Stage I (Precontemplation) to Stage 6 (Termination). By identifying the appropriate Stage of Change an individual is operating from, appropriate levels of treatment may be matched for an effective approach for changing negative behaviors.

Criminal Sentiments Scale (CSS)
The Criminal Sentiments Scale covers 41 items that are grouped into three areas by how they relate to criminal activity. The three areas are attitude toward laws, courts and police; tolerance for law violations; and identification with other criminals.

The Pride in Delinquency Scale (PID)
The Pride in Delinquency Scale is comprised of 10 different items that taps into an individual’s views regarding specific delinquent acts. The scores are summed across the 10 items and added to produce a constant of 100 so all total scores are positive. The score on the PID is positive and linear—the higher the score, the greater the presence of criminal attitudes and thinking.

Program Components

The program components of the Substance Abuse Treatment Programs utilize a cognitive behavioral approach. Program components are under continual review to insure maintaining a strong cognitive emphasis.

Stages of Change Model
Modification of any behavior involves progression through six stages-pre-contemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, maintenance and termination. The “Stages of Change Model” helps to identify the motivational level of the individual to changing their negative behaviors. Once the level of motivation is identified, the appropriate level of “treatment” can be offered, resulting in a longer lasting effect with less resistance.
(Source: In Search of How People Change, Prochaska, DiClemente and Norcross)

General Program Components
General program components have a specific purpose such as raising awareness regarding incorrect thinking or reducing the denial phase of pre-treatment. Each of the program components was selected based on their value in matching the level of motivation (stage of change) with the appropriate program/service of change. (Level of need).

Life without a Crutch
Life without a Crutch is designed as a thirty-six hour program (usually about 6 weeks). The program helps the offenders recognize the self-deceptions they have created to support their addiction. The program raises awareness that there may be a problem with the offender’s current thinking strategies and is designed to move them from Stage I of Pre-contemplation to Stage II of contemplation.

Commitment to Change
Commitment to Change is designed to assist offenders in discovering errors in thinking in themselves and others along with the consequences they create. Techniques are first applied by learning how to properly critique inappropriate behavior exhibited by others. Inevitably, participants begin to apply these insights to themselves. Designed by Psychologist, Stanton E. Samenow, the program is designed for twelve lessons with a workbook. It also raises awareness from Stage I of pre-contemplation to Stage II of contemplation.

Thinking for a Change
Thinking for a Change teaches cognitive restructuring and problem solving by instructing participants in ways to recognize thinking errors and develop social skills. It is designed to be delivered in 22 lessons with the ability to expand even further.

Substance Abuse Treatment
The substance abuse treatment curriculum is interwoven into the general curriculum. The components of the substance abuse treatment are approved as a certified alcohol and drug treatment program. Many programs have adopted the “Criminal Conduct and Substance Abuse Treatment” curriculum developed by Kenneth W. Wanberg and Harvey B Milkman. The curriculum utilizes a cognitive behavioral approach to provide strategies for self-improvement and change in effort to address criminality and substance abuse.

Education Programs
Literacy, Adult Basic Education, and General Education Development Courses will be available through the facility education program for those assessed with an educational need.

Daily Activities

An outline of program activities showing a theoretical weekly schedule is provided. While some variations exist the primary content of all programs is outlined in this schedule. All programs have an initial orientation and assessment period. Orientation and assessment is not included in the synopsis provided. Additionally, Treatment staff members generally utilize two to three hours per day documenting offender progress in treatment files. Treatment team meetings, involving treatment and corrections staff members are held once per week, to discuss offender progress toward identified goals and objectives.

All treatment programs are a minimum of 180 days (6 months) and a maximum of one year in length.

Substance Abuse Treatment Program

Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
2 hours of core treatment
(to include one or more of the following Cognitive Behavioral components: Life without a Crutch, Commitment to Change, Thinking for a Change, or SAT curriculum) Focus of core treatment is relapse prevention, recognizing individual “triggers” to substance abusing behavior, and role-playing refusal techniques and positive behaviors for problem situations.


1 to 2 hour of ancillary groups
(ancillary groups determined by assessments for needs in the following areas: Education – GED/ABE, Relationships – marriage and family groups. Emotional/ Impulse Control – Anger Management.


4-6 hours per day Work assignments
All offenders are required to maintain a job assignment to instill a positive work ethic, and provide the offender an opportunity to practice pro-social behaviors learned while in treatment.


2- 4 hours Structured free time
Allows offenders time to complete homework assignments, attend voluntary support groups (AA/NA) and/or attend religious services. Offenders may utilize free time to communicate with family members through letters or phone calls. Offenders may also engage in recreational activities.

2 hours of core treatment
(to include one or more of the following Cognitive Behavioral components: Life without a Crutch, Commitment to Change, Thinking for a Change, or SAT curriculum) Focus of core treatment is relapse prevention, recognizing individual “triggers” to substance abusing behavior, and role-playing refusal techniques and positive behaviors for problem situations.


1 to 2 hour of ancillary groups
(ancillary groups determined by assessments for needs in the following areas: Education – GED/ABE, Relationships – marriage and family groups. Emotional/ Impulse Control – Anger Management.


4-6 hours per day Work assignments
All offenders are required to maintain a job assignment to instill a positive work ethic, and provide the offender an opportunity to practice pro-social behaviors learned while in treatment.


2- 4 hours Structured free time
Allows offenders time to complete homework assignments, attend voluntary support groups (AA/NA) and/or attend religious services. Offenders may utilize free time to communicate with family members through letters or phone calls. Offenders may also engage in recreational activities.
2 hours of core treatment
(to include one or more of the following Cognitive Behavioral components: Life without a Crutch, Commitment to Change, Thinking for a Change, or SAT curriculum) Focus of core treatment is relapse prevention, recognizing individual “triggers” to substance abusing behavior, and role-playing refusal techniques and positive behaviors for problem situations.


1 to 2 hour of ancillary groups
(ancillary groups determined by assessments for needs in the following areas: Education – GED/ABE, Relationships – marriage and family groups. Emotional/ Impulse Control – Anger Management.


4-6 hours per day Work assignments
All offenders are required to maintain a job assignment to instill a positive work ethic, and provide the offender an opportunity to practice pro-social behaviors learned while in treatment.


2- 4 hours Structured free time
Allows offenders time to complete homework assignments, attend voluntary support groups (AA/NA) and/or attend religious services. Offenders may utilize free time to communicate with family members through letters or phone calls. Offenders may also engage in recreational activities.
2 hours of core treatment
(to include one or more of the following Cognitive Behavioral components: Life without a Crutch, Commitment to Change, Thinking for a Change, or SAT curriculum) Focus of core treatment is relapse prevention, recognizing individual “triggers” to substance abusing behavior, and role-playing refusal techniques and positive behaviors for problem situations.


1 to 2 hour of ancillary groups
(ancillary groups determined by assessments for needs in the following areas: Education – GED/ABE, Relationships – marriage and family groups. Emotional/ Impulse Control – Anger Management.


4-6 hours per day Work assignments
All offenders are required to maintain a job assignment to instill a positive work ethic, and provide the offender an opportunity to practice pro-social behaviors learned while in treatment.


2- 4 hours Structured free time
Allows offenders time to complete homework assignments, attend voluntary support groups (AA/NA) and/or attend religious services. Offenders may utilize free time to communicate with family members through letters or phone calls. Offenders may also engage in recreational activities.
2 hours of core treatment
(to include one or more of the following Cognitive Behavioral components: Life without a Crutch, Commitment to Change, Thinking for a Change, or SAT curriculum) Focus of core treatment is relapse prevention, recognizing individual “triggers” to substance abusing behavior, and role-playing refusal techniques and positive behaviors for problem situations.


1 to 2 hour of ancillary groups
(ancillary groups determined by assessments for needs in the following areas: Education – GED/ABE, Relationships – marriage and family groups. Emotional/ Impulse Control – Anger Management.


4-6 hours per day Work assignments
All offenders are required to maintain a job assignment to instill a positive work ethic, and provide the offender an opportunity to practice pro-social behaviors learned while in treatment.


2- 4 hours Structured free time
Allows offenders time to complete homework assignments, attend voluntary support groups (AA/NA) and/or attend religious services. Offenders may utilize free time to communicate with family members through letters or phone calls. Offenders may also engage in recreational activities.
State FY 2014 funding from grants 2012-JAG-DOC-005, 2012-RSAT-DOC-003 and DOC revolving funds