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Agency-Wide FY2013 Annual Report

Operating Environment

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Departmental services are organized into six distinct divisions: 

Field Operations includes: Agri-Services; Classification and Population; Sentence Administration; Female Offender Diversion Program; Institutions; one female community corrections center; 3 female halfway house facilities; K-9 Program; Oklahoma Correctional Industries; Private Prison and Jail Administration; Construction/Asbestos; Procedures and Accreditation; Safety Administration; Religious and Volunteer Services; Security; and Central Transportation Unit. 

Administrative Services includes: Contracts and Acquisitions; Information Technology; Personnel; and Records Disposition. 

Business Operations includes: Evaluation and Analysis; Finance and Accounting; and Offender Banking.

Community Corrections includes: Five male community corrections centers; fifteen community work centers; eight male halfway house facilities; Probation, Parole and Interstate Services; and six probation and parole districts.

Community Sentencing and Offender Information Services includes: Community Sentencing; and Grants Administration.

Employee Development and Offender Services includes: Medical Services; Mental Health
Services; Oklahoma Correctional Career Development Center; Programs; and Victim Services.

Other administrative units include: Employee Rights and Relations; Executive Communications; Internal Affairs; and General Counsel.

Facility and Community Locations

  • Institutions 
    • Bill Johnson Correctional Center, Alva
    • Dick Conner Correctional Center, Hominy
    • Eddie Warrior Correctional Center, Taft
    • Howard McLeod Correctional Center, Atoka
    • Jackie Brannon Correctional Center, McAlester
    • James Crabtree Correctional Center, Helena
    • Jess Dunn Correctional Center, Taft
    • Jim E. Hamilton Correctional Center, Hodgen
    • John Lilley Correctional Center, Boley
    • Lexington Assessment and Reception Center, Lexington
    • Lexington Correctional Center, Lexington
    • Mabel Bassett Correctional Center, McLoud
    • Mack Alford Correctional Center, Stringtown
    • Northeast Oklahoma Correctional Center, Vinita
    • Oklahoma State Reformatory, Granite
    • Oklahoma State Penitentiary, McAlester
    • William S. Key Correctional Center, Ft. Supply
  • Community Correction Centers 
    • Clara Waters Community Correction Center, Oklahoma City
    • Enid Community Correction Center, Enid
    • Kate Barnard Community Correction Center, Oklahoma City
    • Lawton Community Correction Center, Lawton
    • Oklahoma City Community Corrections Center, Oklahoma City
    • Union City Community Correction Center, Union City
  • Probation and Parole 
    • Northwest District Office, Enid 
      • Sub offices: Alva, Clinton, Cordell, Elk City, Enid, Guthrie, Guymon, Kingfisher, Mangum, Pawhuska, Pawnee, Perry, Ponca City, Skiatook, Stillwater, Watonga, Weatherford, and Woodward
    • Southeast District Office, McAlester 
      • Sub offices: Ada, Antlers, Ardmore, Atoka, Chandler, Coalgate, Durant, Eufaula, Holdenville, Hugo, Idabel, Madill, Marietta, Okemah, Poteau, Shawnee, Stigler, Sulphur, and Wilburton
    • Southwest District Office, Lawton 
      • Sub offices: Altus, Anadarko, Bridge Creek, Chickasha, Duncan, Frederick, Hobart, Norman, Purcell, and Waurika
    • Northeast District Office, Muskogee 
      • Sub offices: Bartlesville, Broken Arrow, Claremore, Jay, Miami, Nowata, Okmulgee, Sallisaw, Sapulpa, Tahlequah, and Vinita

Workforce

Correctional officers comprised the largest segment of the Oklahoma Department of Corrections workforce as of July 1, 2013. Uniformed staff were 80.47% male with an overall age of 42.3.

Non-uniformed staff were 57.4% female with an overall average age of 48.9.

By race, the largest percentage of the agency’s workforce is Caucasian (78.29%) followed by Black (9.66%), American Indian (8.78%), Hispanic (2.5%), and Asian (0.77%) as of July 1, 2013. 

Overall, the total number of filled positions in Fiscal Year 2013 (3,897) is 51 positions less than the total number of filled positions in Fiscal Year 2012 (3,948).

Filled FTE History

FTE numbers are reported in whole numbers. Partial positions are not reflected.

Fiscal Year
Correctional Officers
Probation/Parole Officers
Medical Staff
Others
2004
1,963
291
383
2,010
2005
1,933
300
384
1,974
2006
2,003
337
369
1,996
2007
2,007
340
366
1,990
2008
2,003
345
386
2,086
2009
1,932
344
372
2,046
2010
1,867
312
355.3
1,815
2011
1,761
281
374.8
1,638
2012
1,673
276
383
1,617
2013
1,596
281
376
1,644

Volunteer Services

The agency’s workforce is supplemented through the use of 3,976 volunteers. These volunteers serve in many capacities and provide invaluable services to the Oklahoma Department of Corrections.

Average Number of Volunteer Hours Monthly, Fiscal Year 2013 is 10,506.

Retirements

Oklahoma Department of Corrections employees have an average 13.3 years to retirement eligibility according to the Fiscal Year 2011 Annual Report and Workforce Summary issued by the Office of Management and Enterprise Services (OMES). The table below provides a history of calendar year employee retirements.

Calendar Year 2009 and 2010 numbers are significantly higher because of voluntary retirement buyout. Calendar Year 2013 numbers are through October 31, 2013.

Calendar Year
Number of Retirements
2004
144
2005
114
2006
106
2007
126
2008
161
2009
214
2010
213
2011
86
2012
89
2013
123
Selected Agency
Years of Service
Average Years to Retirement Eligibility
Corrections
11.7
13.3
General Safety, Security Inspections, and Investigations
13.9
21.9
Law Enforcement
14.2
20.9
Social Services
14.9
21.6
Classified Employees
12.5
26.4
Unclassified Employees
11.7
26.7


National Offender Population

According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, at calendar year-end 2012 nearly 6.94 million people in the U.S. were under supervision by adult correctional systems. Of that number, 4,781,300 were either under probation or parole and 1,483,900 were in prison. These numbers were down from 2011 by 0.8% and 1.4%, respectively.

Approximately 7 out of 10 offenders were supervised in the community on probation or parole. Approximately 2 out of 10 were incarcerated in state or federal prison.

The U.S. imprisonment rate for males was 910 per 100,000 residents; for females, the rate was 63 per 100,000 residents.

Just under 3.0% of black males in the country were in state or federal prisons, compared to 0.5% of white males and 1.2% of Hispanic males.

At calendar yearend 2012, there were 45,173 adult offenders under correctional supervision in Oklahoma. Of that number, 20,627 offenders were supervised under probation or parole and 24,546 offenders were incarcerated. The cumulative probation and parole number was down from 2011 by nearly 6.0%, while the percent of offenders incarcerated rose by just under 1.0%.

Of those under correctional supervision, approximately 4.6 out of 10 offenders were supervised in the community on probation or parole. Approximately 5.4 out of 10 offenders were incarcerated.

At fiscal yearend 2013, the rate of Oklahomans under incarcerated supervision for males was 1,178 per 100,000 residents; for females, the rate was 126 per 100,000 residents.

About 4.8% of black males in Oklahoma are incarcerated compared to 0.9% of white males and 0.8% of Hispanic males.

Note: According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Hispanic origin is considered an ethnicity, not a race. Hispanics may be of any race (e.g., black Hispanic, white Hispanic). Therefore, Oklahoma resident population numbers by race are based on the non- Hispanic population. Hispanic category is based on those self-reporting Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish origin. Those reporting Hispanic and white were counted as Hispanic. This same level of distinction is not available for ODOC race/ethnicity data. 

Sources: Bureau of Justice Statistics, Correctional Population in the United States, 2012 (NCJ 43936), Bureau of Justice Statistics, Prisons in 2012 – Advance Counts (NCJ 242467), Bureau of Justice Statistics, Prisons in 2012: Trends in Admissions and Releases, 1991-2012 (NCJ 243920), Oklahoma Department of Corrections, Offender Management System, Evaluation and Analysis fiscal yearend data extracts, U.S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Selected Age Groups by Sex for States: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012.

Oklahoma Offender Population

Incarcerated Offenders 

Of the state’s 26,539 incarcerated offenders (which excludes county jail backup), 53.9% are white and 46.1% are non-white. 

The controlling or major offense of half of Oklahoma’s incarcerated offenders is a non-violent crime. 

The average age of incarcerated offenders is 38.1. 

Compared to the state’s general population, the U.S. Census Bureau reports Caucasians are 75.5% of the state’s population; African Americans represents 7.6% of the state’s population. 

Chart shows that the gender of incarcerated offenders are 10.2 percent female and 89.8 percent male.

Crime Type for Incarcerated Offenders
Percent
Violent
48.2%
Drug-Related
27.1%
Other, Non-Violent
22.2%
Alcohol-Related
2.5%
Ethnicity for Incarcerated Offenders
Percent
Caucasian
53.9%
African American
28.1%
Native American
9.7%
Hispanic
7.7%
Other
.6%

Probation Clients 

The majority of the state’s 21,085 probation clients are primarily white and male. 

The majority of probation clients committed non-violent crimes. 

The average age of probation clients is 36.0. 

Charts shows that gender of probation clients as 23.3 percent female and 76.7 percent male.

Crime Type for Probation Clients
Percent
Violent
24.1%
Drug-Related
34.6%
Other, Non-Violent
33.4%
Alcohol-Related
7.9%
Ethnicity for
Probation Clients
Percent
Caucasian
62.9%
African American
18%
Native American
8.6%
Hispanic
8.1%
Other
2.4%



Parole Clients 

The majority of the state’s 3,059 parole clients are primarily white and male. 

The majority of parole clients committed non-violent crimes. 

The average age of parole clients is 45.3.

Charts shows gender of parole clients as 16.3 percent female and 83.7 percent male.

Crime Type for
Parole Clients
Percent
Violent
21.6%
Drug-Related
56.1%
Other, Non-Violent
20.8%
Alcohol-Related
1.5%
Ethnicity for
Parole Clients
Percent
Caucasian
54.3%
African American
30.5%
Native American
5.2%
Hispanic
8.8%
Other
1.2%


Receptions and Releases, Fiscal Year 2004-Fiscal Year 2013

The following tables show the 10 year trend of offender receptions and releases. Receptions are convicted felons taken into custody of the Oklahoma Department of Corrections.

Offender Prison Receptions by Violent vs. Non-Violent 
Fiscal Year Comparison - FY2004 to FY2013

Fiscal Year
Violent
Non-Violent
2004
2,210
6,507
2005
2,288
6,443
2006
2,288
6,137
2007
2,559
6,345
2008
2,553
6,211
2009
2,615
6,092
2010
2,903
6,473
2011
2,582
5,774
2012
2,641
5,973
2013
2,539
5,870


Offender Prison Releases by Type
Fiscal Year Comparison - FY2004 to FY2013

Fiscal Year
Paroled
Probation
Street
2004
2,238
2,656
3,476
2005
1,655
3,064
3,404
2006
1,106
3,253
3,566
2007
1,105
3,160
3,832
2008
1,257
3,113
4,118
2009
1,117
3,338
4,232
2010
760
3,440
4,350
2011
636
3,489
4,615
2012
497
3,371
4,257
2013
576
3,040
4,025


The table below shows the comparison of the state’s offender population with receptions and releases. 

Offender Population: Incarcerated, Receptions and Releases - FY2004 to FY2013
Population numbers are based on Department of Corrections Weekly Population Analysis, and the receptions and releases are based on data extracted from the Offender Management System. 

Fiscal Year
Population
Receptions
Releases
2004
23,221
8,717
8,370
2005
23,948
8,731
8,123
2006
24,376
8,425
7,925
2007
25,023
8,904
8,097
2008
25,297
8,764
8,488
2009
25,200
8,707
8,687
2010
25,935
9,376
8,550
2011
25,458
8,356
8,740
2012
25,889
8,614
8,125
2013
26,539
8,409
7,641


The table below illustrates yearly offender incarceration growth trends since July 2004. It does not include offenders sentenced to probation or other sanctions.

Yearly Offender Growth Trends

Fiscal Year
Total Sentenced Offenders
DOC Facilities
Contract Beds
Out and Community Programs
2004
23,221
16,592
6,196
433
2005
23,948
17,127
6,174
647
2006
24,376
17,096
6,454
826
2007
25,023
17,697
6,501
825
2008
25,297
17,903
6,530
864
2009
25,200
18,248
6,089
863
2010
25,935
18,336
6,534
1,065
2011
25,458
18,027
6,324
1,107
2012
25,869
18,106
6,420
1,343
2013
26,553
17,902
7,312
1,339


Offenders sentenced to Life Without Parole represent 2.9% of the total offender population.

FY2013 Incarcerated Offenders with Life Without Parole Controlling Offense Types

FY2013 Incarcerated Offenders with Life without parole controlling offense types are 6.3 percent non-violent and 93.7 percent violent.

FY 2013 Incarcerated Offenders with Life Controlling Offense Types

FY 2013 Incarcerated Offenders with Life controlling offense are 4.3 percent non-violent and 95.7 percent violent.

FY 2013 Incarcerated Offenders Serving Over 50 Years for a Controlling Offense

FY 2013 Incarcerated Offenders Serving Over 50 Years for a Controlling Offense are 12.1 percent non-violent and 87.9 percent violent.

County Jail Backup

Offenders sentenced by the court to the Oklahoma Department of Corrections are housed in county jails until actual reception into department custody.

Financial responsibility for offender housing costs shifts from the county to the Oklahoma Department of Corrections upon court sentencing.

The daily charge to the Department by the counties for offenders housed in county jails is set by statute and is currently set at $27 plus all medical costs.

Jail Backup Count Population

Fiscal Year
Jail Backup Count
2004
1,303
2005
1,166
2006
1,536
2007
1,181
2008
1,323
2009
1,542
2010
1,348
2011
1,323
2012
1,561
2013
1,646


Money Paid to Counties for Per Diem and Medical

Fiscal Year
Money Paid to Counties
2004
$11,238,000
2005
$11,549,703
2006
$11,448,303
2007
$12,941,303
2008
$13,370,603
2009
$14,290,103
2010
$19,847,906
2011
$19,548,706
2012
$21,507,706
2013
$26,391,427


Contract Bed Space

Oklahoma began contracting for private prison bed space with Oklahoma private prison facilities in April 1996.

Currently three private facilities in this state have contracts to provide maximum and medium security beds to the Oklahoma Department of Corrections. The agency has contracts with 11 halfway houses for residential services.

The increased use of contract prison beds to accommodate net offender growth has resulted in expenditure growth beyond the agency’s appropriated resources. To meet this cost growth, numerous facility infrastructure, technology, vehicle replacements, programmatic and staffing needs have been chronically deferred, reduced in scope, or reallocated.

Private Prison Expenditures (FY2004 to FY2013)

Fiscal Year
Private Prison Expenditures
2004
$57,473,196
2005
$58,495,200
2006
$59,996,568
2007
$69,349,288
2008
$78,025,384
2009
$77,715,688
2010
$76,693,288
2011
$72,311,088
2012
$72,889,232
2013
$79,285,938

NOTE: In April 2007, the Oklahoma Department of Corrections was evicted from Great Plains Correctional Facility (not shown above), resulting in 804 offenders being moved elsewhere.

Halfway House Expenditures (FY2004 to FY2013)

Fiscal Year
Halfway House Expenditures
2004
$12,072,718
2005
$15,002,206
2006
$14,790,006
2007
$15,604,706
2008
$17,486,712
2009
$17,138,812
2010
$16,465,906
2011
$16,733,506
2012
$14,941,403
2013
$15,574,689


Offender Work Programs

Agri-Services

Agri-Services plays a vital role in enabling offenders to learn valuable job skills and work ethics that can benefit them upon release. Collectively, farm operations total 24,037 acres where livestock production and management, along with farm management skills, are taught utilizing a hands-on method by qualified farm managers. Over 3,400 head of cattle are maintained for beef production; 400 head of dairy cows are maintained for milk production. Agri-Services operates a meat processing plant as well as a food processing plant. Annual production at the meat processing plant is approximately 3,000,000 pounds, and an additional 242,165 pounds of corn dogs and vegetables were processed during 2013 at the food processing plant. Total vegetable production for 2013 was 797,071 pounds, and all is used at the facility kitchens to feed the offender population.
Wheat, corn, milo, pecans, and alfalfa hay are grown on available land to supplement livestock herds and/or to generate cash income for the operation.

Agri Services Total Sales

Fiscal Year
Total Sales
2006
$8,106,967
2007
$8,572,415
2008
$10,345,533
2009
$19,172,154
2010
$9,490,614
2011
$8,790,758
2012
$7,764,177
2013
$10,600,000 (estimated)

Number of Offenders Employed in Enterprise Operations

Fiscal Year
Number of Offenders Employed in Enterprise Operations
2005
466
2006
448
2007
375
2008
372
2009
376
2010
371
2011
338
2012
338
2013
385


Oklahoma Correctional Industries

Oklahoma Correctional Industries operates production facilities at a number of institutions, offering customers quality products at reasonable prices while reducing offender idleness and providing job skills training. This results in significant overall tax savings to the general public. The five largest product lines are license tags and plates, garment operations, modular office systems, upholstered furniture and metal fabrication.

Oklahoma Correctional Industries Total Sales

Fiscal Year
Total Sales
2006
$15,733,376
2007
$19,167,296
2008
$16,165,452
2009
$19,741,891
2010
$14,810,400
2011
$13,619,588
2012
$15,191,881
2013
$15,862,962


Oklahoma Correctional Industries - Number of Offenders Employed in Enterprise Operations

Fiscal Year
Number of Offenders Employed in Enterprise Operations
2005
1,024
2006
1,041
2007
1,156
2008
1,002
2009
1,009
2010
1,168
2011
1,171
2012
1,575
2013
1,133


Offender Treatment Programs

The Programs Unit is responsible for providing various intervention and reentry services to offenders during all facets of incarceration and pre-release. Programs offered to offenders include the following:

Educational Services offerings focus on literacy; adult basic education (ABE); General Equivalency Diploma (GED) acquisition; and CIMC Life Skills. Educational opportunities are available across all security levels.

Each year offenders ODOC offenders earn their high school diplomas and many have access to college courses that lead to acquiring Associates and Bachelor Degrees.

Substance Abuse Programs utilize cognitive behavioral modalities to address drug addiction and abuse. Offenders may participate in treatment programs for periods ranging from four months to a year, depending upon facility locale and program availability. Participation data is collected and analyzed to ensure effectiveness of treatment programs.

Cognitive Restructuring Programs are offered in the form of Thinking for a Change.This programs offer a curriculum that instructs offenders on how to rearrange their thought processes in a way that impacts their behavior in a positive manner.

12,856 offenders participated in treatment related programs during Fy2013.

During FY2013, a total of 12,856 offender participants completed one or more of the programs offered at various facility locations. Substance Abuse Treatment and Cognitive Programs had a combined participant total of 4,014 during this period. Educational Services (Literacy, ABE, GED, and CIMC-Life Skills) provided 8,481 offenders with services in this area.

Several forms of programming is offered to offenders at all facilities within the agency. The table below summarizes program participation.

FY2013 Program Participation

Program
Participation
Substance Abuse Treatment
2,103
Thinking for a Change
1,911
Literacy
1,785
Adult Basic Education
2,058
General Equivalency Diploma
2,279
CIMC Life Skills
2,359
Faith and Character Community
361
Total Served
12,856


Probation and Parole

Probation revocations accounted for 23.4% of FY 2013 receptions. Of the offenders who were received on a probation revocation, 54% were received into prison without a new case and 46% were received with a new case. Some probation violators may have been probationers supervised by an agency other than the department. Parole violators constituted 1.0% of all FY 2013 receptions.

Specific Populations

Medical 

A 2008 Urban Institute Report on Offender Re-entry Health has documented the poor health status of offenders entering prisons as compared with the general population. Offender populations are aging due to longer prison sentences. This circumstance is often made worse by offender’s tendency for unhealthy lifestyles, coupled with a history of substance abuse or other chronic medical conditions. 

The offender population 50 years and older in the Oklahoma Department of Corrections has grown from 85 in 1980 to over 4,729 in Fiscal Year 2013. 

Offender Population 50 Years of Age and Older

Year
50 and Older
1980
85
1994
879
2010
4,064
2011
4,179
2012
4,417
2013
4,729

Note: Data for 1980 and 1994 from Wheeler, et al., 1995. Data for 2010-present are generated using end-of-fiscal year data and only exclude offenders on escapee status.

  • Oklahoma Department of Corrections health care expenditures demonstrate consistent growth, reflecting the national trend. 
  • Factors increasing the cost of offender health care include: Increased offender population, increased average age of offenders, market-driven increases in salaries and benefits of health care personnel, and increased costs of non-Department of Corrections physician and hospital services. 

Less tangible factors affecting costs include: Improved overall quality of care, compliance with community standards of care, and the evolution of medical technology. 

The table below illustrates Oklahoma Department of Corrections health care expenditures have increased from $55,061,688 in Fiscal Year 2004 to over $59,000,000 in Fiscal Year 2013. 

Offender Health Care Expenditures

Fiscal Year
Expenditures
2004
$55,061,688
2005
$60,800,604
2006
$66,728,504
2007
$69,127,408
2008
$70,697,808
2009
$65,891,904
2010
$63,113,304
2011
$62,692,304
2012
$59,114,404
2013

(Fiscal Year 2013 costs are budgeted, not actual.)

$59,114,426


Offender Health Care Expenditures - Daily

Fiscal Year
Daily Expenditures
2004
$6.67
2005
$7.20
2006
$7.80
2007
$7.94
2008
$7.97
2009
$7.40
2010
$7.04
2011
$7.01
2012
$7.35
2013
$6.41


Mental Health

Offenders with mental health problems continue to be increasingly overrepresented in the DOC populations compared to the community:

FY2013 Prison Population
Number
Percentage
History of or current symptoms of a mental illness:
14,625
55%
Current symptoms of a mental illness:
8,705
33%
Current Intellectual or cognitive disability:
292
1%

Note: No offenders were excluded from this analysis.

FY2006 through FY2013 Changes in Psychotropic Medication Distribution
From FY2006 through FY2013, the number of offenders on psychotropic medications increased from 4,072 to 6,248, a 53% increase, while the general population eligible to receive these medications increased by nearly 8%.

Fiscal Year
Population on Psychotropics
2006
4,072
2007
4,279
2008
4,917
2009
4,894
2010
5,160
2011
5,146
2012
6,061
2013
6,248

The Oklahoma Department of Corrections and the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) collaborative Mental Health Reentry Program transitions incarcerated offenders with serious mental illness into appropriate community-based mental health services in the community. Reentry Intensive Care Coordination Teams (RICCTs) are under ODMHSAS contracts to be responsible for engaging with the offender with serious mental illness prior to discharge and then working with them in the community until they are fully participating in the appropriate community-based mental health and substance abuse services.

The table below summarizes the FY2012 and FY2013 average monthly number of mental health services.

Mental Health Services Activities
FY2012 Services
FY2013 Services
Offenders in Group Sessions
1,637
1,158
Number of Group Sessions
332
230
Number of Individual Therapy Sessions
3,224
3,335
Offenders Seen for Psychotropic Medication Management
2,589
2,829
Crisis Interventions
849
900
Staff Consultations
1,408
1,239

Number of Offenders Served Fiscal Year

Services
FY2012
FY2013
Integrated Service Discharge Managers
253
256
Reentry Intensive Care Coordination Teams
158
207
Enhanced Integrated Co-Occurring Treatment Services
424
225

A recent outcome analysis of the program that was performed by ODMHSAS showed promising results. Outcomes of offenders served during the first 36 months of the program were compared with a baseline group comprised of similar individuals.

Collaborative Mental Health Reentry Program

Outcome Measure
Baseline
The baseline comparison group was comprised of similar individuals prior to program implementation (2006)
RICCT
Inpatient hospitalizations
8.7%
1.1%
Outpatient service utilization
55.1%
78.4%
Rate of Engagement in Community Based Services
11.7%
65.3%
Offenders Engaged in Medicaid 90 Days Post Release
14.5%
42.1%
Offenders Returning to Prison within 36 Months
42.3%
24.2%

From FY2006 through FY2013, the number of offenders on psychotropic medications increased from 4,072 to 6,248, a 53% increase, while the general population eligible to receive these medications increased by nearly 8%.

Female Offenders

Oklahoma has consistently ranked first in the rate of female incarceration nationally, and projections for the female offender population through Fiscal Year 2013 indicate that ranking will continue. 

The steady, small increases in female offender numbers reflect reception and release patterns that have stayed consistent in recent years. However, reception numbers appear to be slowing down possibly decreasing.

Female Offender Population Actual and Projected Through FY2013

Fiscal Year
Population
2005
2,475
2006
2,458
2007
2,566
2008
2,690
2009
2,649
2010
2,670
2011
2,606
2012
2,648
2013
2,702

NOTE: FY05-FY06 numbers come from the closest population analysis report to the end of the fiscal year. These numbers in include all DOC facilities, contract locations, and incarcerated offenders under Probation and Parole supervision (i.e., GPS/EMP), but exclude offenders that are temporarily on the OUT count status (e.g., hospital, court, jail). FY07-present generated from the Offender Management System (OMS) and include all DOC facilities, as well as offenders that are temporarily on the OUT count status.

Hispanic Offenders

The Hispanic/Latino offender population in Oklahoma prisons is the fastest growing racial/ethnic population in the system. While the numbers are not a large proportion of the total offender population at this time, their growth and rate of increase pose definite issues for effective and efficient management of department institutions.

For 2011, the US Census Bureau estimates the Hispanic population in Oklahoma to be 8.9% of the total population. The DOC Hispanic offender population is slightly over 7.7% of the DOC incarcerated population.

Hispanic Offender Population Actual and Projected Through FY2013

Fiscal Year
Population
2005
1,185
2006
1,357
2007
1,511
2008
1,721
2009
1,704
2010
1,864
2011
1,918
2012
1,972
2013
2,048

NOTE: Numbers generated from the Offender Management System (OMS) and include all DOC facilities, contract locations, and incarcerated offenders under Probation and Parole supervision (i.e., GPS/EMP), as well as offender that are temporarily on the OUT count status (e.g., hospital, court, jail).

National Funding and Expenditure Trends

In fiscal 2012, corrections spending represented 3.3 percent of total state spending and 6.9 percent of general fund spending. General fund dollars are the primary source for state corrections and account for $46.0 billion, or 86.4 percent, of all fiscal 2012 state corrections spending. State funds (general funds and other state funds combined, but excluding bonds) accounted for 96.6 percent of total state corrections spending in fiscal 2012. Federal funds accounted for 1.9 percent and bonds accounted for 1.5 percent. Federal funds for corrections declined by 34.5 percent in fiscal 2012, as American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds began to expire. However, even with the sharp decline in federal funds, total state spending for corrections still grew by 3.3 percent, illustrating the fact that state correctional services are almost entirely financed by state funds.

State spending on corrections in fiscal 2013 is estimated to total $53.1 billion, a 0.2 percent decline from fiscal 2012. State funds are estimated to increase by 0.3 percent, while federal funds are estimated to decline by 11.7 percent. The slight decline in the overall growth rate is partly due to recent efforts states have taken to control corrections spending. From fiscal 1987 to fiscal 2012, nominal spending from state funds for corrections increased from $11.4 billion to $51.3 billion. Over the past several years, states have begun targeting criminal justice reforms to address the cost drivers of corrections expenditures.

The same report also documented expenditures for Oklahoma in fiscal 2012. Oklahoma corrections expenditures were 2.5% of total state spending and 6.1% of total state general fund spending. According to the report, the state’s corrections expenditures totaled $522 million in fiscal 2012.

The state general fund is the dominant source of the state’s corrections spending for fiscal 2012, providing 76.2%, of total monies spent in corrections. This percentage is considerably lower than the national average of general fund support reported for the same year (86.4%). Fiscal 2012 state general fund and other state funds made up 99.4 % of total corrections spending. This percentage for Oklahoma was considerably higher than the national average of 96.6%.

In contrast, fiscal 2012 federal funds accounted for only 0.57% of the total monies spent in corrections. This level of federal funds was below the national average (1.9%) reported for the same fiscal year.

SOURCE: National Association of State Budget Officers, State Expenditure Report (Fiscal 2011-2013)

Oklahoma’s high costs associated with a high rate of per capita incarceration are reflected in the percentage of general revenue fund expenditure.

Although Oklahoma corrections takes a larger share of general revenue funds, the state has one of the lowest incarceration per diem rates, the result of incarcerating higher percentages of state citizens compared to surrounding states.

Appropriations History, FY2005 to FY2014

Fiscal Year
Appropriation
Percent Change Prior Year
Supplemental
Total State Appropriations
2005
384,286,568
2.8
17,924,000
5,358,101,676
2006
$409,443,403
6.5
$24,000,000
$6,038,003,816
2007
$456,004,876
11.4
$32,664,573
$6,738,268,544
2008
$482,619,998
5.8
$24,000,000
$7,048,169,281
2009
$503,000,000
4.2
$0
$7,089,333,227
2010
$469,025,000
-6.8
$7,200,000
$6,999,468,194
2011
$462,141,777
-1.5
$0
$6,691,837,225
2012
$459,831,068
-0.5
$0
$6,504,270,090
2013
$463,731,068
0.8%
$0
$0
2014
$463,731,068
0.00%
$0
$0


Corrections as Percentage of Total General Fund Expenditures, FY 2013
Source: National Association of State Budget Officers: State Expenditure Report (Fiscal Year 2010-2012 Data)

State
Percentage of Total General Fund Expenditures
New Mexico
5.9
Kansas
5.6
Missouri
7.3
Arkansas
8.5
Oklahoma
7.9
Texas
8.5
Colorado
9.2


The following table provides a breakdown of Fiscal Year 2013 Actual Expenditures by expenditure type for the Department of Corrections.

FY2013 Actual Expenditures by Expenditure Type

Expenditure Type
Percentage of Actual Expenditures
Salaries and Benefits
51%
Private Prisons and Contracts
28%
Other
Over 1 Million: Merchandise for Resale (OCI and Agri-Services); Outside Medical Care; Offender Pay; Rent Expense; Production, Safety and Security; Shop Expense; General Operating Expenses
Under 1 Million: Travel Agency Direct Payments; Incentive Payments; Travel reimbursements; Lease Purchasing; Library Equipment-Resources; Land; Livestock

8%
Food/Supplies and Materials
6%
Utilities/Administration
3%
Maintenance/Repairs and Building Construction
2%
Equipment
1%
Debt Service
1%

Source: DOC Finance and Accounting

Restitution to Victims

The following table provides a breakdown of restitution fees paid to victims since Fiscal Year 2004. 

Restitution Paid to Victims

Fiscal Year
Restitution Paid to Victims
2004
$1,943,896
2005
$1,937,104
2006
$1,692,986
2007
$1,853,136
2008
$2,016,553
2009
$1,983,539
2010
$2,197,065
2011
$1,771,559
2012
$1,447,250
2013
$1,270,299


Following is a summary of the Oklahoma Department of Corrections Fiscal Year 2015 appropriation request.

Priority
Item
Total
A
Annualize fully funded contract beds for FY 2014
$31,506,682

TOTAL REQUESTED APPROPRIATION INCREASE
$31,506,682

REQUESTED FY 2015 APPROPRIATION
$495,237,750


Department of Corrections 2014 Proposed Legislative Initiatives

Clarify list of crimes excluded from eligibility for delayed sentencing.

Amend Sex Offender Registration Act to clarify registration requirement does not apply while offender is incarcerated.

Increase time frame from six (6) months to twelve (12) months from scheduled release for Parole Board docketing of nonviolent offenders when all facilities reach maximum capacity and DOC contracts for bedspace.

Amend statute on offender medical care to have DOC pay Medicaid reimbursement for inpatient hospitalization rather than current network rate.

Exempt offenders serving LWOP from requirement to deposit 20% wages in mandatory savings, payable upon discharge.