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Agency-Wide FY2012 Annual Report

Foreword

Welcome to another edition of the Oklahoma Department of Corrections annual report. The department provides an effective and efficient correctional system to the great state of Oklahoma. This is evident by maintaining our low daily per diem rates and low recidivism numbers while experiencing and responding to the great recession. From 2008 through 2011, the department experienced continued net offender growth while also reducing the budget and absorbing unfunded mandates that exceeded $78 million dollars.

Our profession is driven by evidence-based practices and quality data analysis. Data analysis and other key indicators in this report will assist decision makers in determining needs, trends and future directions for our profession. Planning for everything from an aging offender population, employee compensation and retention, to sustainable natural resources will assist in maintaining a high quality of effectiveness and efficiencies.

It is impossible for an annual report to include every aspect of a complex correctional system and profession. This report attempts to focus on those areas and supporting data that is most requested and beneficial to stakeholders.

Our most valuable asset is our well trained professional workforce so I dedicate this annual report to the employees who so graciously serve the state by sacrificing other aspects of their lives to be dedicated public servants. Public service is a calling and to all employees who answer that call…the state thanks you. Printer-friendly version of the annual report.

Content

Operating Environment

Departmental services are organized into five distinct divisions:

Field Operations includes: Agri-Services; Classification, Population, and Sentence Administration; Female Offender Operations; Female Offender Diversion Program; Institutions; two female community corrections centers; 3 female halfway house facilities; K-9 Program; Oklahoma Correctional Industries; Private Prison and Jail Administration; Construction/Asbestos; Procedures and Accreditation; Safety Administration; Religious and Volunteer Services; Security; and Central Transportation Unit. 

Administrative Services includes: Contracts and Acquisitions; Departmental Services; Evaluation and Analysis; Finance and Accounting; Information Technology; Personnel; Training and Staff Development; Records Disposition; and Metro Affirmative Action. 

Community Corrections includes: Five male community corrections centers; fifteen community work centers; eight male halfway house facilities; Parole and Interstate Services; and six probation and parole districts.

Community Sentencing and Offender Information Services includes: Community Sentencing; Correctional Offender Management Information Tracking (COMIT); and Grants Transition Team.

Treatment and Rehabilitative Services includes: Medical Services; Mental Health Services; Programs; and Victim Services.

Other administrative units include: Employee Rights and Relations; Executive Communications;
Internal Affairs; and General Counsel.

Workforce

Correctional officers comprised the largest segment of the Oklahoma Department of Corrections workforce as of July 1, 2012. Uniformed staff were 80.01% male with an overall age of 42.8. Non-uniformed staff were 56.5% female with an overall average age of 48.5.

By race, the largest percentage of the agency’s workforce is Caucasian (78.5%) followed by Black (9.3%), American Indian (8.7%), Hispanic (2.5%), and Asian (1.0%) as of July 1, 2012.

Overall, the total number of filled positions in Fiscal Year 2012 (3,948) is 107 positions less than the total number of filled positions in Fiscal Year 2011 (4,055).

Employees and Base Salary by Residence County (based by zip code in HR system).

County of Residence
Base Salary
Cimarron
$0.00
Texas
$74,809
Beaver
$280,681
Harper
$755,416
Woods
$3,793,403
Ellis
$25,942
Roger Mills
$0.00
Beckham
$798,900
Woodward
$3,464,174
Alfalfa
$3,632,796
Major
$661,474
Grant
$190,506
Garfield
$3,013,567
Kay
$98,721
Noble
$0.00
Dewey
$110,796
Custer
$257,638
Blaine
$65,087
Kingfisher
$111,370
Logan
$289,646
Payne
$491,290
Oklahoma
$19,216,400
McClain
$3,740,848
Harmon
$29,547
Jackson
$2,344,466
Kiowa
$1,798,018
Cotton
$120,702
Jefferson
$273,506
Carter
$674,297
Marshall
$398,410
Bryan
$583,159
Seminole
$672,189
Okfuskee
$3,288,157
Pittsburg
$15,700,664
Osage
$3,895,644
Pawnee
$1,283,733
Washington
$828,426
Nowata
$71,814
Craig
$2,474,585
Ottawa
$781,824
Rogers
$542,003
Tulsa
$5,135,140
Mayes
$348,296
Delaware
$373,423
Adair
$32,270
Cherokee
$552,298
Wagoner
$1,315,121
Creek
$406,991
Okmulgee
$864,614
Muskogee
$7,416,639
Sequoyah
$256,582
Washita
$242,032
Caddo
$208,856
Grady
$681,549
Canadian
$2,584,083
Cleveland
$15,906,945
Garvin
$1,740,986
Greer
$3,482,751
Comanche
$2,514,105
Tillman
$293,110
Stephens
$1,114,958
Love
$36,975
Murray
$273,457
Johnston
$387,534
Lincoln
$1,159,304
Pottawatomie
$4,279,709
McIntosh
$1,867,083
Haskell
$675,609
Latimer
$940,930
LeFlore
$4,468,790
McCurtain
$521,226
Choctaw
$770,512
Pushmataha
$1,158,695
Atoka
$5,297,792
Coal
$1,170,274
Hughes
$1,083,418
Pontotoc
$461,964

Department of Corrections Filled FTE History

This table illustrates the changes in filled FTE since July 1, 2003. FTE numbers are reported in whole numbers. Partial positions are not reflected.

Fiscal Year
Correctional Officers
Probation/Parole Officers
Medical Staff
Others
2003
1,963
286
379
2,037
2004
1,963
291
383
2,010
2005
1,933
300
384
1,974
2006
2,003
337
369
1,996
2007
2,007
340
366
1,990
2008
2,003
345
386
2,086
2009
1,932
344
372
2,046
2010
1,867
312
355.3
1,815
2011
1,761
281
374.8
1,638
2012
1,673
276
383
1,617


Retirements

Oklahoma Department of Corrections employees have an average 13.3 years to retirement eligibility according to the Fiscal Year 2011 Annual Report and Workforce Summary issued by the Office of Personnel Management.

Selected Agency
Average Years of Service
Average Years to Retirement Eligibility
Corrections
11.7
13.3
General Safety, Security Inspections, and Investigations
13.9
21.9
Law Enforcement
14.2
20.9
Social Services
14.9
21.6
Classified Employees
12.5
26.4
Unclassified Employees
11.7
26.7


The following table provides a history of calendar year employee retirements:
NOTE: Calendar Year 2012 numbers are through October 31, 2012.

Fiscal Year
Number of Retirements
2003
117
2004
144
2005
114
2006
106
2007
126
2008
161
2009
214
2010
213
2011
86
2012
89


Volunteers

The agency’s workforce is supplemented through the use of 3,514 volunteers. These volunteers serve in many capacities and provide invaluable services to the Oklahoma Department of Corrections. The average number of volunteer hours monthly for fiscal year 2012 is 11,404.

National Offender Population

On November 29, 2012, the Bureau of Justice Statistics reported on the number of adult offenders under adult correctional supervision for 2011. According to the report over 6.98 million people in the U. S. were under supervision by adult correctional systems. Of that number 4,814,200 were either under probation or parole and 1,504,150 were in prison. These numbers were down from 2010 by 1.5% and 1.1% respectively. 

Approximately 7 out of 10 offenders were supervised in the community on probation or parole. Approximately 3 out of 10 were incarcerated in state or federal prison. 

The national rate for males was 932 per 100,000 residents; for females the rate was 65 per 100,000 residents. 

About 3.0% of black males in the country are in state or federal prison, compared to slightly over 0.5% of white males and 1.2% of Hispanic males.

In 2011, there were 46,246 adult offenders under correctional supervision in Oklahoma. Of that number, 21,877 offenders were supervised under probation or parole and 24,369 offenders were incarcerated. These numbers were down from 2010 by 10.6% and 1.5%, respectively.

Of those under correctional supervision, approximately 4.7 out of 10 offenders were supervised in the community on probation or parole. Approximately 5.3 out of 10 offenders were incarcerated.

The rate of Oklahomans under correctional supervision for males was 1,167 per 100,000 residents; for females, the rate was 128 per 100,000 residents. About 4.6% of black males in Oklahoma are incarcerated, compared to 0.8% of white males and 0.8% of Hispanic males.

Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics, Correctional Population in the United States, 2011 (NCJ 239972) and Bureau of Justice Statistics, Prisons in 2011, December 2012 (NCJ 234808).

Oklahoma Offender Population

Incarcerated Offenders

Of the state’s 25,889 incarcerated offenders (which excludes county jail backup), 53.6% are white and 46.4% are non-white. 

The controlling or major offense of half of Oklahoma’s incarcerated offenders is a nonviolent crime.

The average age of incarcerated offenders is 37.8.

Compared to the state’s general population, the U.S. Census Bureau reports Caucasians are 75.8% of the state’s population; African Americans represents 7.7% of the state’s population.

Incarcerated Offenders by Gender

Charts shows Incarcerated offenders are 10.2 percent female and 89.8 percent male.

Incarcerated Offenders by Crime Type

Crime Type
Percentage
Violent
48%
Drug-Related
28%
Other, Non-Violent
21%
Alcohol-Related
2%


Incarcerated Offenders by Ethnicity

Ethnicity
Percentage
Caucasian
53.64%
African American
28.91%
Native American
9.32%
Hispanic
7.62
Other
.52

Probation Clients

The majority of the state’s 20,815 probation clients are primarily white and male. 

The majority of probation clients committed non-violent crimes.

The average age of probation clients is 36.0

Probation Clients by Gender

Charts shows probation clients are 23.46 percent female and 76.54 percent male

Probation Clients by Crime Type

Crime Type
Percentage
Drug-Related
35%
Other, Non-Violent
34%
Violent
23%
Alcohol-Related
8%

Probation Clients by Ethnicity

Ethnicity
Percentage
Caucasian
63%
African American
19%
Native American
8%
Hispanic
8%
Other
2%

Parole Clients

The majority of the state’s 3,069 parole clients are primarily white and male.

The majority of parole clients committed nonviolent crimes.

The average age of parole clients is 45.3.

Parole Clients by Gender

Charts shows parole clients are 16.23 percent female and 83.77 percent male.

Parole Clients by Crime Type

Crime Type
Percentage
Drug-Related
56%
Violent
23%
Other, Non-Violent
20%
Alcohol-Related
1%

Parole Clients by Ethnicity

Ethnicity
Percentage
Caucasian
55%
African American
31%
Hispanic
8%
Native American
5%
Other
1%


Receptions and Releases,  Fiscal Year 2003-Fiscal Year 2012

The following tables show the 10-year trend of offender receptions and releases. Receptions
are convicted felons taken into custody of the Oklahoma Department of Corrections.

Offender Prison Receptions by Violent versus Non-Violent
Fiscal Year Comparison - FY2003 to FY2012

Fiscal Year
Violent Number
of Receptions
Non-Violent Number of Receptions
2003
2,061
6,171
2004
2,210
6,507
2005
2,288
6,443
2006
2,288
6,137
2007
2,559
6,345
2008
2,553
6,211
2009
2,615
6,092
2010
2,903
6,473
2011
2,582
5,774
2012
2,641
5,973

Offender Prison Releases by Type
Fiscal Year Comparison - FY2003 to FY2012

Fiscal Year
Number of
Releases to Parole
Number of Releases to Split Sentence-Probation
Number of Releases to the Street
2003
1,712
2,705
3,598
2004
2,238
2,656
3,476
2005
1,655
3,064
3,404
2006
1,106
3,253
3,566
2007
1,105
3,160
3,832
2008
1,257
3,113
4,118
2009
1,117
3,338
4,232
2010
760
3,440
4,350
2011
636
3,489
4,615
2012
497
3,371
4,257


Offender Population: Incarcerated, Receptions and Releases - FY2003 to FY2012
Note: Population numbers are based on Department of Corrections Weekly Population Analysis, and the receptions and releases are based on data extracted from the Offender Management System.

The table below shows the comparison of the state’s offender population with receptions and releases.

Fiscal Year
Population
Receptions
Releases
2003
23,006
8,232
8,015
2004
23,221
8,717
8,370
2005
23,948
8,731
8,123
2006
24,376
8,425
7,925
2007
25,023
8,904
8,097
2008
25,297
8,764
8,488
2009
25,200
8,707
8,687
2010
25,935
9,376
8,550
2011
25,458
8,356
8,740
2012
25,889
8,614
8,125


The table below illustrates yearly offender incarceration growth trends since July 2003.
It does not include offenders sentenced to probation or other sanctions.

Yearly Offender Growth Trends
"Out and Community Programs" includes offenders in hospitals, in transit to courts, GPS and the electronic monitoring, and other community programs. 

Fiscal Year
Total Sentenced Offenders
DOC Facilities
Contract Beds
Out and Community Programs
2003
23,006
16,231
6,405
370
2004
23,221
16,592
6,196
433
2005
23,948
17,127
6,174
647
2006
24,376
17,096
6,454
826
2007
25,023
17,697
6,501
825
2008
25,297
17,903
6,530
864
2009
25,200
18,248
6,089
863
2010
25,935
18,336
6,534
1,065
2011
25,458
18,027
6,324
1,107
2012
25,869
18,106
6,420
1,343

FY2012 Incarcerated Offenders with Life Without Parole Controlling Offense Types

Charts shows Incarcerated offenders with Life without parole controlling offense types as violent 94 percent and non-violent 6 percent.

FY 2012 Incarcerated Offenders Serving >50 Years for a Controlling Offense

Chart shows incarcerated offenders serving over 50 years at 88 percent violent and 12 percent non-violent.

FY 2012 Incarcerated Offenders with Life Controlling Offense Types

Charts shows incarcerated offenders with Life controlling offense types as 96 percent violent and 4 percent non-violent.

Average Sentences for Top "Nonviolent" Admissions
Oklahoma Department of Corrections, Receptions FY05-FY10 
Source: Council of State Governments Justice Center
Property crimes (Burglary II, Forged Instrument, Stolen Property, and Unauthorized Vehicle) clustered together average a sentence length of 4.8 years.

"Nonviolent" Sentence
Average Sentence Years
Trafficking
10.3 years
Manufacturing
10 years
Distribution
7.3 years
Convicted felon charged with possession of firearms
5.6 years
Possession
5.2 years
Burglary II
4.9 years
Forged Instrument
4.8 years
Stolen property
4.7 years
Unauthorized vehicle
4.5 years
DUI
3.9 years

County Jail Backup

Offenders sentenced by the court to the Oklahoma Department of Corrections are housed in county jails until actual reception into department custody. 

Financial responsibility for offender housing costs shifts from the county to the Oklahoma Department of
Corrections upon court sentencing.

The daily charge to the Department by the counties for this service is set by statute and is currently set at $27 plus all medical costs. 

The table below illustrates the jail backup bed growth since the end of FY 2003. The number of offenders as part of the county jail backup population has been trending upwards since FY 2003.

Jail Backup Count Population

Fiscal Year
Jail Backup Count Population
2003
1,108
2004
1,303
2005
1,166
2006
1,536
2007
1,181
2008
1,323
2009
1,542
2010
1,348
2011
1,323
2012
1,561

Money Paid to Counties for Per Diem and Medical

Fiscal Year
Money Paid to Counties for Per Diem and Medical
2003
$7,413,648
2004
$11,238,000
2005
$11,549,703
2006
$11,448,303
2007
$12,941,303
2008
$13,370,603
2009
$14,290,103
2010
$19,847,906
2011
$19,548,706
2012
$21,207,728


Contract Bed Space
Oklahoma began contracting for private prison bed space with Oklahoma private prison facilities in April 1996. 

Currently three private facilities in this state have contracts to provide maximum and medium security beds to the Oklahoma Department of Corrections. The agency has contracts with 11 halfway houses for residential services.

The increased use of contract prison beds to accommodate net offender growth has resulted in expenditure growth beyond the agency’s appropriated resources. To meet this cost growth, numerous facility infrastructure, technology, vehicle replacements, programmatic and staffing needs have been
chronically deferred, reduced in scope, or reallocated.

Private Prison Expenditures (FY2004 TO FY2012)
In April 2007, the Oklahoma Department of Corrections was evicted from Great Plains Correctional Facility (not shown above), resulting in 804 offenders being moved elsewhere.

Fiscal Year
Private Prison Expenditures
2004
$57,473,196
2005
$58,495,200
2006
$59,996,568
2007
$69,349,288
2008
$78,025,384
2009
$77,715,688
2010
$76,693,288
2011
$72,311,088
2012
$72,889,227


Halfway House Expenditures (FY2004 to FY2012)
Note: Does not reflect agency costs for administration, recordkeeping, or monitoring.

Fiscal Year
Halfway House Expenditures
2004
$12,072,718
2005
$15,002,206
2006
$14,790,006
2007
$15,604,706
2008
$17,486,712
2009
$17,138,812
2010
$16,465,906
2011
$16,733,506
2012
$14,941,393


Offender Work Programs

Agri-Services plays a vital role in enabling offenders to learn valuable job skills and work ethics that can benefit them upon release. Collectively, Department of Corrections Agri-Services farm operations total 24,037 acres where livestock production and management, along with farm management skills, are taught by qualified farm managers. Agri-Services farm operations maintain a herd of over 3,101 beef cattle and 454 head of dairy cattle for meat and milk production to support feeding of offenders. Agri-Services produces grass hay and alfalfa hay, wheat, and other small grains to supplement the winter-feeding of livestock.

Agri-Services also operate facilities to process meat and vegetables that are ultimately used for offender meals. 

Agri-Services Total Sales

Fiscal Year
Agri-Services Total Sales
2006
$8,106,967
2007
$8,572,415
2008
$10,345,533
2009
$10,172,154
210
$9,490,614
2011
$8,790,758
2012
$7,764,177


Oklahoma Correctional Industries operates production facilities at a number of institutions, offering customers quality products at reasonable prices while reducing offender idleness and providing job skills training. This results in significant overall tax savings to the general public. The five largest product lines are license tags and plates, garment operations, modular office systems, upholstered furniture and metal fabrication. 

Correctional Industries Total Sales

Fiscal Year
Correctional Industries Total Sales
2006
$15,733,376
2007
$19,167,296
2008
$16,165,452
2009
$19,741,891
2010
$14,810,400
2011
$13,619,588
2012
$15,191,881


The tables below illustrate the number of offenders employed in these enterprise operations. 

Fiscal Year
Number of Offenders Employed in
Agri-Services
2005
466
2006
448
2007
410
2008
372
2009
376
2010
338
2011
338
2012
324


Fiscal Year
Number of Offenders Employed in Oklahoma Correctional Industries
2005
1,024
2006
1,041
2007
1,156
2008
1,002
2009
1,009
2010
1,168
2011
1,171
2012
1,575


Offender Treatment Programs

Substance abuse programs utilize cognitive behavioral modalities to address drug addiction and abuse behaviors. Program durations are from four months to one year in duration based on facility location and individual progress in treatment.

Educational Services to include General Equivalency Diploma (GED); Adult Basic Education (ABE); Literacy; and CIMC Life Skills. Education opportunities are available across all levels of security. 

Thinking for a Change classes are offered at multiple facilities and security levels. This curriculum teaches offenders how to restructure their thinking so their behavior is positively impacted. 

The economic crisis in 2009-10 forced the discontinuation of all sex offender treatment programs and reduced or eliminated several substance abuse treatment programs. Private foundation funds afforded a slight recovery with the addition of 40 treatment slots between the gender specific substance abuse treatment programs located at Eddie Warrior and Mabel Bassett Correctional Centers. State appropriated dollars afforded the expansion of treatment programs at Joseph Harp Correctional Center, Elk City Community Work Center and Enid Community Corrections Center. 

Efforts continue to provide treatment services to offenders with the utmost need. Changes contained in HB 3052, the "Justice Reinvestment Act," requires the development of Intermediate Revocation Facilities (IRF) and the development of programming for revoked offenders. 

A recent comparison performed by the Evaluation and Analysis Unit of prison releases from July 1, 2005 - June 30, 2009, found that offenders assessed with a substance abuse treatment need who completed treatment returned at a lower rate than offenders with an assessed need for treatment who did not participate in programming.

Several types of programs are offered to offenders at all prisons in the system. The table below summarizes program participation.

FY2012 Program Participation

Program
Participants
Substance Abuse Treatment
2,394
Thinking for a Change
2,847
Literacy
1,769
Adult Basic Education
2,091
General Equivalency Diploma
2,214
CIMC Life Skills
2,536
Faith and Character Community
358


FY06-FY09 Prison Releases Completing SAT/RTP During Prison Term
Note: Based on prison releases from July 1, 2005 - June 30, 2009 who also completed SAT/RTP. May have completed course before July 1, 2005.

Recidivated
Number Male
Percentage Male
Number Female
Percentage Female
Number Overall
Percentage Overall
Treatment Completions
646
23.1
81
12.8
727
21.2
Nonparticipation
2,631
24.2
303
14.3
2,934
22.6
Total
3,277

384

3,661


Probation and Parole

Probation revocations accounted for 25.4% of FY 2012 receptions. Of the offenders who were received on a probation revocation, 51.1% were received into prison without a new case and 48.9% were received with a new case. Some probation violators may have been probationers supervised by an agency other than the department. Parole violators constituted 1.0% of all FY 2012 receptions.

Specific Populations 

Medical

A 2008 Urban Institute Report on Offender Re-entry Health has documented the poor health status of offenders entering prisons as compared with the general population. Offender populations are also aging due to longer prison sentences. This circumstance is often made worse by offender’s tendency for unhealthy lifestyles, coupled with a history of substance abuse or other chronic medical conditions.

The offender population 50 years and older in the Oklahoma Department of Corrections has grown from 85 in 1980 to over 4,484 in Fiscal Year 2012.

  • The projected population aged 50 years or older is expected to be 5,254 by Fiscal Year 2013, a 48% increase, while the overall offender population is expected to grow 10%.

  • Oklahoma Department of Corrections health care expenditures demonstrate consistent growth, reflecting the national trend.

  • Factors increasing the cost of offender health care include: Increased offender population, increased average age of offenders, market-driven increases in salaries and benefits of health care personnel, and increased costs of non-Department of Corrections physician and hospital services.

Less tangible factors affecting costs include: Improved overall quality of care, compliance with community standards of care, and the evolution of medical technology.

Offender Population 50 Years of Age and Older
Note: Does not include out-count population. Data for 1980 and 1994 from Wheeler, et al., 1995. Data for 2011 from Oklahoma Department of Corrections Offender Management  System.

Year
50 and Older
Total Population
Percentage of Total Offender Population
1980
85
1,746
4.9%
1994
879
13,689
6.4%
2010
3,952
27,283
14.5%
2011
3,824
25,458
15.0%
2012
4,484
25,889
17.32%


The table below illustrates Oklahoma Department of Corrections health care expenditures have increased from $50,636,369 in Fiscal Year 2003 to over $59,000,000 in Fiscal Year 2012, an increase of 17%. 

Offender Health Care Expenditures

Fiscal Year
Offender Health Care Expenditures
2003
$50,636,369
2004
$55,061,688
2005
$60,800,604
2006
$66,728,504
2007
$69,127,408
2008
$70,697,808
2009
$65,891,904
2010
$63,113,304
2011
$62,692,304
2012
$59,114,404


Despite the increase in health care expenditures, the agency has improved efficiency as evidenced by
the drop in daily costs shown in the table below.

Offender Health Care Expenditures - Daily

Fiscal Year
Daily Offender Health Care Expenditures
2003
$6.14
2004
$6.67
2005
$6.67
2006
$7.20
2007
$7.94
2008
$7.97
2009
$7.40
2010
$7.04
2011
$7.01
2012
$6.46


Mental Health

Offenders with mental health problems continue to be increasingly overrepresented in the DOC populations compared to the community:

  • History of or current symptoms of a mental illness: 12,265 incarcerated offenders
  • Current symptoms of serious mental illness: 7,238 incarcerated offenders
  • Suffer from a serious developmental or cognitive disability: 222

From FY06 through FY12, the number of offenders on psychotropic medications increased from 4,072 to 5,744, a 29% increase, while the general population increased only 5%.

The Oklahoma Department of Corrections and the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) collaborative Mental Health Reentry Program transitions incarcerated offenders with serious mental illness into appropriate community-based mental health services in the community. Reentry Intensive Care Coordination Teams (RICCTs) are under ODMHSAS contracts to be responsible for engaging with the offender with serious mental illness prior to discharge and then working with them in the community until they are fully participating in the appropriate community-based mental health and substance abuse services.

Several types of mental health services are offered to offenders at all prisons in the system. The table below summarizes the FY2012 average monthly number of mental health services.

Mental Health Services Activities
Services
Offenders in Group Sessions
1,637
Number of Group Sessions
332
Number of Individual Therapy Sessions
3,224
Offenders Seen for Psychotropic Medication Management
2,589
Crisis Interventions
849
Staff Consultations
1,408


A recent outcome analysis of the program that was performed by ODMHSAS showed promising results. Outcomes of offenders served during the first 36 months of the program were compared with a baseline group comprised of similar individuals.

Collaborative Mental Health Reentry Program

Outcome Measure
Baseline
The baseline comparison group was comprised of similar individuals prior to program implementation (2006)
RICCT
Inpatient hospitalizations
8.7%
1.6%
Outpatient service utilization
55.1%
83.8%
Rate of Engagement in Community Based Services
11.7%
63.6%
Offenders Engaged in Medicaid 90 Days Post Release
14.5%
46.8%
Offenders Returning to Prison within 36 Months
42.3%
25.2%


Female Offenders

  • Oklahoma has consistently ranked first in the rate of female incarceration nationally, and projections for the female offender population through Fiscal Year 2013 indicate that ranking will continue.
  • The steady, small increases in female offender numbers reflect reception and release patterns that have stayed consistent in recent years. However, reception numbers appear to be slowing down possibly decreasing.

Female Offender Population Actual and Projected Through FY2013

Fiscal Year
Female Offender Population Actual and Projected
2005
2,557
2006
2,608
2007
2,701
2008
2,721
2009
2,649
2010
2,760
2011
2,607
2012
2,637
2013
2,660


Hispanic Offenders

The Hispanic/Latino offender population in Oklahoma prisons is the fastest growing racial/ethnic
population in the system. While the numbers are not a large proportion of the total offender
population at this time, their growth and rate of increase pose definite issues for effective and efficient management of department institutions.

For 2011, the US Census Bureau estimates the Hispanic population in Oklahoma to be 8.9% of
the total population. The DOC Hispanic offender population is slightly over 7.62% of the DOC
incarcerated population.

Hispanic Offender Population Actual and Projected Through FY2013

Fiscal Year
Hispanic Offender Population Actual and Projected
2005
1,185
2006
1,357
2007
1,511
2008
1,721
2009
1,704
2010
1,864
2011
1,918
2012
2,013
2013
1,972


National Funding and Expenditure Trends

As with other areas of the state budget, spending growth on corrections has slowed considerably over the past several years; as recently as fiscal 2007 state spending on corrections grew by 10.1 percent. Some of the actions states took to rein in corrections spending included closing prisons and other correctional facilities, the early release of prisoners, sentencing reform and employee furloughs.

In fiscal 2011, corrections spending represented 3.1 percent of total state spending and 7.5 percent
of general fund spending. General fund dollars are used primarily to fund state corrections spending
and account for $47.6 billion, or 91.5 percent, of all fiscal 2011 state corrections spending. State
funds (general funds and other state funds combined, but excluding bonds) accounted for 95.8 percent of total state corrections spending in fiscal 2011. Federal funds accounted for 2.9 percent and
bonds accounted for 1.3 percent, due to the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009
(ARRA), which produced $1.9 billion in corrections funds. However, in fiscal 2011 federal funds
are estimated to decline by 26.0 percent as ARRA corrections spending slows to $783 million. Federal funds for corrections are estimated to decline even further in fiscal 2012 by 39.4 percent as
ARRA corrections spending is reduced to $433 million.

The same report also documented expenditures for Oklahoma in FY11. Oklahoma corrections expenditures were 2.3% of total state spending and 9.3% of total state general fund spending. According to the report, the state’s corrections expenditures totaled $487 million in FY 11.

The state general fund is the dominant source of the state’s corrections spending, providing 92.8%,
or $52 million, of total monies spent in corrections. This percentage is slightly higher than the national average of general fund support reported for the same year (91.5%).

Total state funds made up 99.6 % of total corrections spending. This percentage for Oklahoma was
considerably higher than the national average of 95.8%.

In contrast, federal funds accounted for only 0.42% of the total monies spent in corrections. This
level of federal funds was below the national average (2.9%) reported for the same fiscal year.

SOURCE: National Association of State Budget Officers, State Expenditure Report (Fiscal 2010 - 2012)

Oklahoma’s high costs associated with a high rate of per capita incarceration are reflected in the percentage of general revenue fund expenditure.

Although Oklahoma corrections takes a larger share of general revenue funds, the state has one of the lowest incarceration per diem rates, the result of incarcerating higher percentages of state citizens compared to surrounding states.

Appropriations History, FY2003 TO FY2013

Fiscal Year
Appropriations
Percent Change Prior Year
Supplemental
Total State Appropriations
2004
$373,931,566
3.3
$5,000,000
$5,106,597,024
2005
$384,286,568
2.8
$17,924,000
$5,358,101,676
2006
$409,443,403
6.5
$24,000,000
$6,038,003,816
2007
$456,004,876
11.4
$32,664,573
$6,738,268,544
2008
$482,619,998
5.8
$24,000,000
$7,048,169,281
2009
$503,000,000
4.2
$0
$7,089,333,227
2010
$469,025,000
-6.8
$7,200,000
$6,999,468,194
2011
$462,141,777
-1.5
$0
$6,691,837,225
2012
$459,831,068
-0.5
$0
$6,504,270,090
2013
$463,731,068
0.8%
$0
$0


Corrections as Percentage of Total General Fund Expenditures, FY 2010
Source: National Association of State Budget Officers: State Expenditure Report Fiscal Year 2010

State
Percentage
New Mexico
5.2%
Kansas
5.3%
Missouri
8.3%
Arkansas
8.1%
Oklahoma
7.8%
Texas
4.3%
Colorado
8.0%


The following table provides a breakdown of Fiscal Year 2012 Actual Expenditures by expenditure
type for the Department of Corrections.

Expenditure Type
Percentage
Salaries and Benefits
53%
Private Prisons and Contracts
27%
Other
Other Expenditures-
Over 1 Million: Merchandise for Resale (OCI and Agri-Services); Outside Medical Care; Offender Pay; Rent
Expense; Production, Safety and Security; Shop Expense; General Operating Expenses
Under 1 Million: Travel Agency Direct Payments; Incentive Payments; Travel reimbursements; Lease Purchasing; Library Equipment-Resources; Land; Livestock and Poultry; Employee reimbursements (Non-Travel); Payments to Local Government; Reimbursement

7%
Food/Supplies and Materials
6%
Utilities and Administration
3%
Maintenance/Repairs and Building Construction
2%
Debt Service
1%
Equipment
1%


Restitution to Victims

The following table provides a breakdown of restitution fees paid to victims since Fiscal Year 2003.

Fiscal Year
Restitution Paid to Victims
2003
$1,729,456
2004
$1,943,896
2005
$1,937,104
2006
$1,692,986
2007
$1,853,136
2008
$2,016,553
2009
$1,983,539
2010
$2,197,065
2011
$1,771,559
2012
$1,447,250


Following is a summary of the Oklahoma Department of Corrections Fiscal Year 2014 appropriation request.

Priority
Item
Total
A
Market Adjustment for Classified Employees
$12,200,000
B
Funding for Staffing Adjustments
$2,998,533
C
Offender Growth and Per Diem Restoration
$13,697,537
D
Operating Costs
$9,313,111
E
Non-Discretionary Increases - Medical Services
$9,500,000
F
Non-Discretionary Increases - T&RS
$1,282,850
G
Efficiency Improvements
$634,000
H
Infrastructure and Equipment Improvements
$9,197,730
I
Improvements to Maintain or Increase Security
$6,331,100
J
Improvements to Maintain Vehicles
$810,000
K
Information Technology/Other Technology Upgrades
$749,000

TOTAL REQUESTED APPROPRIATION INCREASE
$66,713,861

REQUESTED FY 2014 APPROPRIATION
$530,444,929


Department of Corrections 2013 Proposed Legislative Initiatives

  • Amend statute regarding drug or alcohol assessment, required for certain crimes, allowing for third party payment of the assessment fee. This change would allow grants, social service agencies, or family members to assist with the fee.

  • Modify statute to specify that DOC approved substance abuse treatment programs shall satisfy the 10 or 24 hour alcohol and drug program required by Drug or Alcohol Assessment.

  • Amend powers of the Director to authorize award of the badge of an employee who dies while employed to the spouse or next of kin of the deceased employee.

  • Amend powers of the Director to authorize payment of $100.00 per month for the maintenance and cleaning of uniforms to all uniformed correctional officers.

  • Amend private prison statute to require contractors housing Oklahoma offenders or offenders from other jurisdictions to furnish information regarding a riot, escape, or other serious emergency and facility operations upon request of Oklahoma DOC. Failure to comply may result in fines to be assessed.

  • Amend private prison statute to assess liquidated damages when a contractor houses maximum security offenders for longer than 30 days without authorization.

Contact DOC

Main Location
3400 Martin Luther King Avenue
Oklahoma City, OK 73111-4298


Mailing
PO Box 11400
Oklahoma City, OK  73136-0400


Phone: (405) 425-2500
Fax: (405) 425-2578


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