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Agency-Wide FY2011 Annual Report


Workforce

Correctional officers comprised the largest segment of the Oklahoma Department of Corrections workforce as of July 1, 2011. Uniformed staff were 80.7% male with an overall age of 40.8.  Non-uniformed staff were 56.7% female with an overall average age of 50.1.

By race, the largest percentage of the agency’s workforce is Caucasian (77.9%) followed by Black (9.6%), American Indian (9.2%), Hispanic (2.4%), and Asian (0.9%) as of July 1, 2011. 

Overall, the total number of filled positions in Fiscal Year 2011 (4,054) is 295 positions less than the total number of filled positions in Fiscal Year 2010 (4,349).

Department of Corrections Filled FTE History
This table illustrates the changes in filled FTE since July 1, 2002.  NOTE: FTE numbers are reported in whole numbers. Partial positions are not reflected.

Fiscal Year
Correctional Officers
Probation/
Parole Officers
Medical Staff
Others
2002
2,065
302
394
2,198
2003
1,963
286
379
2,037
2004
1,963
291
383
2,010
2005
1,933
300
384
1,974
2006
2,003
337
369
1,996
2007
2,007
340
366
1,990
2008
2,003
345
386
2,086
2009
1,932
344
372
2,046
2010
1,867
312
355.3
1,815
2011
1,761
281
374.8
1,638


Retirement
Oklahoma Department of Corrections employees have an average 13.2 years to retirement eligibility according to the Fiscal Year 2010 Annual Report and Workforce Summary issued by the Office of Personnel Management.

Selected Agency
Average Years of Service
Average Years to Retirement Eligibility
Corrections
11.9
13.2
General Safety, Security Inspections, and Investigations
9.3
13.9
Law Enforcement
13.3
14.4
Social Services
11.4
14.5
Classified Employees
12.2
12.3
Unclassified Employees
11.8
11.4


The following table provides a history of calendar year employee retirements:

Calendar Year
Number of Retirements
2002
129
2003
117
2004
144
2005
114
2006
106
2007
126
2008
161
2009
214
2010
213
2011
86


Volunteers
The agency’s workforce is supplemented through the use of 4,674 volunteers. These volunteers serve in many capacities and provide invaluable services to the Oklahoma Department of Corrections. The average number of volunteer hours monthly for fiscal year 2011 is 12,391.

National Offender Population

On December 15, 2011, the Bureau of Justice Statistics reported on the number of adult offenders under adult correctional supervision for 2010. According to the report over 7 million people in the U. S. were under supervision by adult correctional systems. Of that number 4,888,000 were either under probation or parole and 1,518,000 were in prison. These numbers were down from 2009 by 1.3% and 0.4% respectively.

Approximately 7 out of 10 offenders were supervised in the community on probation or parole. Approximately 2 out of 10 were incarcerated in state or federal prison.

The rate of U.S. imprisonment dropped to 497 inmates per 100,000 residents, continuing a decline that started in 2007.

The national rate for males was 938 per 100,000 residents; for females the rate was 67 per 100,000 residents. About 1.3% of black males in the country are in state or federal prison, compared to slightly over 0.5% of white males and 1.3% of Hispanic males.

Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics, Correctional Population in the United States, 2010 (NCJ 236319).


Oklahoma Offender Population

Incarcerated Offenders Demographics

Of the state’s 25,478 incarcerated offenders (which excludes county jail backup), 53.6% are white and 46.8% are non-white. 

The controlling or major offense of half of Oklahoma’s incarcerated offenders is a non-violent crime.

The average age of incarcerated offenders is 37.6. Compared to the state’s general population, the U.S. Census Bureau reports Caucasians are 72.2% of the state’s population; African Americans represents 7.4% of the state’s population.

Crime Type of Incarcerated Offenders

Crime Type
Percentage
Violent
48%
Drug-Related
28%
Other, Non-Violent
21%
Alcohol-Related
3%


Ethnicity of Incarcerated Offenders

Crime Type
Percentage
Caucasian
53.59%
African American
29.34%
Native American
9.02%
Hispanic
7.52%
Other
.52%


Gender of Incarcerated Offenders

Chart shows that incarcerated offenders are 10.23 percent female and 89.77 percent male.

Probation Clients Demographics

The majority of the state’s 21,629 probation clients are primarily white and male.

The majority of probation clients committed nonviolent crimes.

The average age of probation clients is 35.8.

Crime Type of Probation Clients

Crime Type
Percentage
Violent
23%
Drug-Related
36%
Other, Non-Violent
32%
Alcohol-Related
8%


Ethnicity of Probation Clients

Crime Type
Percentage
Caucasian
62.26%
African American
19.32%
Native American
8.13%
Hispanic
8.15%
Other
2.14%


Gender of Probation Clients

Chart shows probation clients are 23.07 percent female and 76.93 percent male.

Parole Client Demographics

The majority of the state’s 3,300 parole clients are primarily white and male.

The majority of parole clients committed non-violent crimes. 

The average age of parole clients is 44.5.

Crime Type of Parole Clients

Crime Type
Percentage
Violent
22%
Drug-Related
53%
Other, Non-Violent
23%
Alcohol-Related
1%


Ethnicity of Parole Clients

Crime Type
Percentage
Caucasian
56.18%
African American
30.21%
Native American
4.33%
Hispanic
8.21%
Other
1.06%


Gender of Parole Clients

Chart shows parole clients are 15.73 percent female and 84.27 percent male.

Receptions and Releases, Fiscal Year 2002 – Fiscal Year 2011

The following tables show the 10 year trend of offender receptions and releases. Receptions are convicted felons taken into custody of the Oklahoma Department of Corrections.

Offender Prison Receptions by Violent vs. Non-Violent, Fiscal Year Comparison - FY 2002 to FY2011

Fiscal Year
Violent
Non-Violent
2002
2,136
6,258
2003
2,061
6,171
2004
2,210
6,507
2005
2,288
6,443
2006
2,288
6,137
2007
2,559
6,345
2008
2,553
6,211
2009
2,615
6,092
2010
2,903
6,473
2011
2,582
5,774


Offender Prison Releases by Type, Fiscal Year Comparison - FY 2002 to FY2011

Fiscal Year
Paroled
Split Sentence-Probation
Street
2002
1,975
2,516
3,568
2003
1,712
2,705
3,598
2004
2,238
2,656
3,476
2005
1,655
3,064
3,404
2006
1,106
3,253
3,566
2007
1,105
3,160
3,832
2008
1,257
3,113
4,118
2009
1,117
3,338
4,232
2010
760
3,440
4,350
2011
636
3,489
4,615


Offender Population: Incarcerated, Receptions and Releases - FY 2003 to FY 2011

Fiscal Year
Population
Receptions
Releases
2003
23,006
8,232
8,015
2004
23,221
8,717
8,370
2005
23,948
8,731
8,123
2006
24,376
8,425
7,925
2007
25,023
8,904
8,097
2008
25,297
8,764
8,488
2009
25,200
8,707
8,687
2010
25,935
9,376
8,550
2011
25,458
8,356
8,740

Note: Population numbers are based on Department of Corrections Weekly Population Analysis, and the receptions and releases are based on data extracted from the Offender Management System.

Yearly Offender Growth Trends

The table below shows the comparison of the state’s offender population with receptions and releases.

Fiscal Year
Total Sentenced Offenders
DOC Facilities
Contract Beds
Out and
Community Programs
includes offenders in hospitals, in transit to courts, GPS and other electronic monitoring, and other community programs.
2002
22,918
15,478
7,067
373
2003
23,006
16,231
6,405
370
2004
23,221
16,592
6,196
433
2005
23,948
17,127
6,174
647
2006
24,376
17,096
6,454
826
2007
25,023
17,697
6,501
825
2008
25,297
17,903
6,530
864
2009
25,200
18,248
6,089
863
2010
25,935
18,336
6,534
1,065
2011
25,458
18,027
6,324
1,107


Offenders sentenced to Life Without Parole represent 2.9% of the total offender population.

FY 2011 Incarcerated Offenders with Life Without Parole Controlling Offense Types

Chart shows that fiscal year 2011 incarcerated offenders with life without parole are 7 percent non-violent and 93 percent violent.

FY 2011 Incarcerated Offenders Serving >50 Years for a Controlling Offense

Chart shows that fiscal year 2011 incarcerated offenders serving over 50 years for a contollign offense are 12 percent non-violent and 88 percent violent.

FY 2011 Incarcerated Offenders with Life Controlling Offense Types

Charts shows fiscal year 2011 incarcerated offender with life controlling offense types are 3 percent non-violent and 97 percent violent.

County Jail Backup

Offenders sentenced by the court to the Oklahoma Department of Corrections are housed in county jails until actual reception into department custody.

Financial responsibility for offender housing costs shifts from the county to the Oklahoma Department of Corrections upon court sentencing.

The daily charge to the Department by the counties for this service is set by statute and is currently set at $27 plus all medical costs. Currently three private facilities in this state have contracts to provide medium and maximum security beds to the Oklahoma Department of Corrections.

The tables below illustrate the jail backup bed growth since the end of FY 2000. The number of offenders as part of the county jail backup population has been trending upwards since FY 2000.

Jail Backup Count Population

Fiscal Year
Jail Backup Count Population
2002
629
2003
1,108
2004
1,303
2005
1,166
2006
1,536
2007
1,181
2008
1,323
2009
1,542
2010
1,348
2011
1,323


Money Paid to Counties for Per Diem and Medical

Fiscal Year
Money Paid to Counties for Per Diem and Medical
2002
$6,896,733
2003
$7,413,648
2004
$11,238,000
2005
$11,549,703
2006
$11,448,303
2007
$12,941,303
2008
$13,370,603
2009
$14,290,103
2010
$19,847,906
2011
$16,423,259


Contract Bed Space

Oklahoma began contracting for private prison bed space with Oklahoma private prison facilities in April 1996.

Currently three private facilities in this state have contracts to provide maximum and medium security beds to the Oklahoma Department of Corrections. 

The increased use of contract prison beds to accommodate net offender growth has resulted in expenditure growth beyond the agency’s appropriated resources. To meet this cost growth, numerous facility infrastructure, technology, vehicle replacements, programmatic and staffing needs have been chronically deferred, reduced in scope, or reallocated.

Private Prison Expenditures (FY2004 TO FY2011)

Fiscal Year
Private Prison Expenditures
2004
$57,473,196
2005
$58,495,200
2006
$59,996,568
2007
$69,349,288
2008
$78,025,384
2009
$77,715,688
2010
$76,693,288
2011
$72,311,088


Halfway House Expenditures (FY2004 TO FY2011)

Fiscal Year
Halfway House Expenditures
2004
$12,072,718
2005
$15,002,206
2006
$14,790,006
2007
$15,604,706
2008
$17,486,712
2009
$17,138,812
2010
$16,465,906
2011
$16,733,506



Offender Work Programs

Agri-Services plays a vital role in enabling offenders to learn valuable job skills and work ethics that can benefit them upon release. Collectively, Department of Corrections’ Agri-Services farm operations total 25,585 acres where livestock production and management, along with farm management skills, are taught by qualified farm managers. Agri-Services farm operations maintain a herd of over 3,200 beef cattle and 345 head of dairy cattle for meat and milk production to support feeding of offenders. Agri-Services produces grass hay and alfalfa hay, wheat, and other small grains to supplement the winter-feeding of livestock.

Agri-Services also operate facilities to process meat and vegetables that are ultimately used for offender meals.

Agri-Services Total Sales

Fiscal Year
Agri-Services Total Sales
2006
$8,106,967
2007
$8,572,415
2008
$10,345,533
2009
$10,172,154
2010
$9,490,614
2011
$8,790,758


Number of Offenders Employed in Agri-Services Enterprise Operations

Fiscal Year
Number of Offenders
2005
466
2006
448
2007
410
2008
372
2009
376
2010
338
2011
338


Oklahoma Correctional Industries operates production facilities at a number of institutions, offering customers quality products at reasonable prices while reducing offender idleness and providing job skills training. This results in significant overall tax savings to the general public. The five largest product lines are license tags and plates, garment operations, modular office systems, upholstered furniture and metal fabrication.

Correctional Industries Total Sales

Fiscal Year
Correctional Industries Total Sales
2006
$15,733,376
2007
$19,167,296
2008
$16,165,452
2009
$19,741,891
2010
$14,810,400
2011
$13,619,588


Number of Offenders Employed in Correctional Industries Enterprise Operations

Fiscal Year
Number of Offenders
2005
1,024
2006
1,041
2007
1,156
2008
1,002
2009
1,009
2010
1,168
2011
1,171

Probation and Parole

The following tables present a statistical overview of offenders in probation and parole for Fiscal Year’s 2009, 2010 and 2011.

Probation revocations accounted for 25.0% of FY 2010 receptions. Of these, 12.8% were received without a new case and 12.2% were received into prison with a new case. Some probation violators may have been probationers supervised by an agency other than the department. Parole violators constituted 1.2% of all FY 2010 receptions.

Revocations

Fiscal Year
Technical/Absconders
(Offenders who have committed technical violations of their supervision)
Law Violations
Specialty Courts
(Drug Court and Mental Health Court) These figures reflect only those offenders supervised by the Department of Corrections.
Total
2009
443
1,021
241
1,705
2010
309
1,028
142
1,479
2011
311
920
169
1,400
Difference
-30.2%
+.6%
-41.1%
-13.3%


Employment

Fiscal Year
Employment
2009
79%
2010
78%
2011
78%
Difference
-1.1%


Offender Treatment Programs

  • Substance abuse programs utilize cognitive behavioral modalities to address drug addiction and abuse behaviors. Program durations are from four months to one year in duration based on facility location and individual progress in treatment.
  • The Sex Offender Psycho-Education Program (SOPEP) is offered to motivate offenders to seek treatment services upon release. SOPEP is offered by DOC mental health professionals.
  • Educational Services to include General Equivalency Diploma, Adult Basic Education, Literacy, and Life Skills classes are available across all levels of security.
  • Thinking for a Change classes are offered at multiple facilities and security levels. This curriculum teaches offenders how to restructure their thinking so their behavior is positively impacted. 
  • The state’s current economic crisis has resulted in a reduction or elimination of several substance abuse treatment programs. To date, 295 male treatment slots and 40 female treatment slots have been eliminated (335 total). Both sex offender treatment programs ceased operation in March 2010.
  • Based on recent survival analysis studies performed by the Evaluation and Analysis Unit, it was found that offenders who completed an approved substance abuse treatment program reduced their chances of returning to prison by 20% compared to a matched sample of offenders who did not complete the program. These findings are statistically significant and demonstrate that effective programming can reduce recidivism rates. Overall, the recidivism rate in FY 2010 for offenders released 36 months earlier was 23.4%.
  • This survival analysis compares the percentage of offenders who have not returned to custody of the Oklahoma Department of Corrections within 36 months to a control group of released offenders who did not receive treatment.

Research indicates that if offenders are taught new skills and behaviors, recidivism is reduced.
The department only utilizes programs that are evidence-based in reducing recidivism.

Several types of programs are offered to offenders at all prisons in the system. The table below summarizes program participation.

FY2011 Program Participation

Program
Participants
Substance Abuse Treatment
2,205
Sex Offender Psycho-Educational Program
164
Thinking for a Change
3,181
Moral Reconation Therapy
107
Literacy
2,053
Adult Basic Education
2,268
General Equivalency Diploma
2,347
Life Skills
2,488
Faith and Character Community
429


Program Impact on Returning Offenders, FY 2002 to FY 2007
Return Rate for Treatment Group is defined as the percentage of offenders who received the treatment program specified and returned to the custody of the Department of Corrections within 36 months of release. Return Rate for Matched Sample is defined as the percentage of offenders who did not receive the treatment program specified and returned to the custody of the Department of Corrections within 36 months of release.

Treatment Group
Return Rate for Treatment Group
Return Rate for Matched Sample
Percent Difference
Female - Substance Abuse Treatment Graduates
13.51
26.30
12.79
Male - Substance Abuse Treatment Graduates
18.51
33.14
14.63
Female - Adult Basic Education Graduates
Time period for these treatment groups is July 1, 2002 to December 31, 2007.
2.21
20.22
18.01
Male - Adult Basic Education Graduates
Time period for these treatment groups is July 1, 2002 to December 31, 2007.
10.12
32.59
22.47
Female - Literacy Graduates
Time period for these treatment groups is July 1, 2002 to December 31, 2007.
8.84
22.15
13.31
Male - Literacy Graduates
Time period for these treatment groups is July 1, 2002 to December 31, 2007.
10.21
31.89
20.65


Specific Populations

Medical

  • A 2008 Urban Institute Report on Offender Re-entry Health has documented the poor health status of offenders entering prisons as compared with the general population. Offender populations are also aging due to longer prison sentences. This circumstance is often made worse by offender’s tendency for unhealthy lifestyles, coupled with a history of substance abuse or other chronic medical conditions.

    The offender population 50 years and older in the Oklahoma Department of Corrections has grown from 85 in 1980 to over 3,800 in Fiscal Year 2011. 
  • The projected population aged 50 years or older is expected to be 5,254 by Fiscal Year 2013, a 48% increase, while the overall offender population is expected to grow 10%. 
  • Oklahoma Department of Corrections health care expenditures demonstrate consistent growth, reflecting the national trend. 
  • Factors increasing the cost of offender health care include: Increased offender population, increased average age of offenders, market-driven increases in salaries and benefits of health care personnel, and increased costs of non-Department of Corrections physician and hospital services.

    Less tangible factors affecting costs include: Improved overall quality of care, compliance with community standards of care, and the evolution of medical technology.

Offender Population 50 Years of Age and Older
Note: Does not include out-count population. Data for 1980 and 1994 from Wheeler, et al., 1995. Data for 2011 from Oklahoma Department of Corrections Offender Management System.

Year
50 and Older
Total Population
Percentage of Total Offender Population
1980
85
1,746
4.9%
1994
879
13,689
6.4%
2010
3,952
27,283
14.5%
2011
3,824
25,458
15.0%


Offender Health Care Expenditures
The table below shows Oklahoma Department of Corrections health care expenditures have increased from $37,973,000 in Fiscal Year 2002 to over $62,000,000 in Fiscal Year 2011, an increase of 79.5%.

Fiscal Year
Offender Health Care Expenditures
2002
$37,973,000
2003
$50,636,369
2004
$55,061,688
2005
$60,800,604
2006
$66,728,504
2007
$69,127,408
2008
$70,697,808
2009
$65,891,904
2010
$63,113,304
2011
$62,692,304


Offender Health Care Expenditures - Daily
Despite the increase in Health Care expenditures, the agency has improved efficiency as evidenced by the drop in daily costs shown in the table below.

Fiscal Year
Daily Offender Health Care Expenditures
2002
$6.04
2003
$6.14
2004
$6.67
2005
$6.67
2006
$7.20
2007
$7.94
2008
$7.97
2009
$7.40
2010
$7.04
2011
$7.01


Mental Health

  • The closure of state mental health hospital beds continues to impact the increasing number and percentage of offenders with serious mental illness who enter the state prisons. One indicator of this increase is the fact that the number of offenders incarcerated in DOC increased 20% from FY1998 to FY2010, while the number of incarcerated offenders requiring psychotropic medications increased 292%. Approximately 6,500 of the 25,949 incarcerated offenders have been diagnosed with a serious mental health problem and approximately 5,000 require and consent to psychotropic medications.

The Oklahoma Department of Corrections and the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) collaborative Mental Health Reentry Program transitions incarcerated offenders with serious mental illness into appropriate community-based mental health services in the community. Reentry Intensive Care Coordination Teams (RICCTs) are under ODMHSAS contracts to be responsible for engaging with the offender with serious mental illness prior to discharge and then working with them in the community until they are fully participating in the appropriate community-based mental health and substance abuse services.

Mental Health Services (FY2011 Actuals)
Offenders
Number of Offenders Discharged through Integrated Service Discharge Managers
264
Number of Offenders Provided Reentry through RICCTs
146
Number of Incarcerated Offenders Provided Enhanced Integrated Co-Occurring Treatment Services
575


Female Offenders

  • Oklahoma has consistently ranked first in the rate of female incarceration nationally, and projections for the female offender population through Fiscal Year 2013 indicate that ranking will remain high.

  • The steady, small increases in female offender numbers reflect reception and release patterns that have stayed consistent in recent years. Overall, the reception numbers have remained slightly larger than the releases in the period. 

The table below illustrates the increasing number of female offenders.

Female Offender Population Actual and Projected Through FY2013

Fiscal Year
Female Offender Population
2005
2,557
2006
2,608
2007
2,701
2008
2,721
2009
2,649
2010
2,760
2011
2,607
2012
2,660
2013
2,687


Hispanic Offenders

The Hispanic/Latino offender population in Oklahoma prisons is the fastest growing racial/ethnic population in the system. While the numbers are not a large proportion of the total offender population at this time, their growth and rate of increase pose definite issues for effective and efficient management of department institutions.

The table below illustrates the increasing number of Hispanic offenders.

Hispanic Offender Population Actual and Projected Through FY2013

Fiscal Year
Hispanic Offender Population Actual and Projected through FY2013
2005
1,185
2006
1,357
2007
1,511
2008
1,721
2009
1,704
2010
1,864
2011
1,918
2012
2,013
2013
2,117


For 2011, the US Census Bureau estimates the Hispanic population in Oklahoma to be 8.9% of the total population. The DOC Hispanic offender population is slightly over 7.5% of the DOC population.

National Funding and Expenditures Trends

The National Association of State Budget Officers estimated spending on corrections by all states totaled $51.1 billion in fiscal 2010, a 3.2 percent decrease compared to fiscal 2009. State spending on corrections in fiscal 2011 is estimated to total $51.7 billion, a 1.3 percent increase from fiscal 2010 but still below fiscal 2009 levels. As with other areas of the state budget, spending growth on corrections has slowed considerably due to widespread revenue shortfalls and limited resources; as recently as fiscal 2007; state spending on corrections grew by 10.1 percent.

Some of the actions states took to rein in corrections spending included closing prisons and other correctional facilities, the early release of prisoners, sentencing reform and employee furloughs.

In fiscal 2010, corrections spending represented 3.1 percent of the total of state spending and 7.3 percent of general fund spending. General fund dollars are used primarily to fund state corrections spending and account for $45.5 billion, or 89.1 percent, of all fiscal 2010 state corrections spending. State funds (general funds and other state funds combined, but excluding bonds) accounted for 94 percent of total state corrections spending in fiscal 2010.

Federal funds accounted for 3.9 percent and bonds accounted for 2.1 percent. Overall federal funds grew sharply in fiscal 2010 by 37.5 percent, due to the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), which provided $1.7 billion in corrections funds. However, in fiscal 2011, federal funds are estimated to decline by 31.1 percent decrease as ARRA corrections spending slows to $720 million. In contrast, state funds for corrections declined by 4.4 percent in fiscal 2010 but are estimated to grow by 3.4 percent in fiscal 2011 as states begin to deal with the wind down of Recovery Act fund.

Oklahoma’s high costs associated with a high rate of per capita incarceration are reflected in the percentage of general revenue fund expenditure.

Although Oklahoma corrections takes a larger share of general revenue funds, the state has one of the lowest incarceration per diem rates, the result of incarcerating higher percentages of state citizens compared to surrounding states.

Corrections as Percentage of Total General Fund Expenditures, FY2010
Source: National Association of State Budget Officers: State Expenditure Report Fiscal Year 2010

State
Percentage
New Mexico
5.2%
Kansas
5.3%
Missouri
8.3%
Arkansas
8.1%
Oklahoma
7.8%
Texas
4.3%
Colorado
8.0%


Appropriations History, FY2003 to FY2012

Fiscal Year
Appropriation
% Change prior year
Supplemental
Total State Appropriations
2003
$361,991,555
-3.1
$18,800,000
$5,532,095,223
2004
$373,931,566
3.3
$5,000,000
$5,106,597,024
2005
$384,286,568
2.8
$17,924,000
$5,358,101,676
2006
$409,443,403
6.5
$24,000,000
$6,038,003,816
2007
$456,004,876
11.4
$32,664,573
$6,738,268,544
2008
$482,619,998
5.8
$24,000,000
$7,048,169,281
2009
$503,000,000
4.2
$0
$7,089,333,227
2010
$469,025,000
-6.8
$7,200,000
$6,999,468,194
2011
$462,141,777
-1.5
$0
$6,691,837,225
2012
$459,831,068
-0.5



The following table provides a breakdown of Fiscal Year 2011 Actual Expenditures by expenditure type for the Department of Corrections.

FY 2011 Actual Expenditures by Expenditure Type

Expenditure Type
Percentage
Salaries and Benefits
54%
Private Prisons and Contracts
26%
Other
Other Expenditures-
Over 1 Million: Merchandise for Resale (OCI/Agri-Services); Outside Medical Care; Offender Pay; Rent Expense; Production, Safety/Security; Shop Expense; General Operating Expenses 

Under 1 Million: Travel Agency Direct Payments; Incentive Payments; Travel reimbursements; Lease Purchasing; Library Equipment-Resources; Land; Livestock/Poultry; Employee reimbursements (Non-Travel); Payments to Local Government; Reimbursement
7%
Food/Supplies and Materials
5.5%
Utilities/Administration
3%
Maintenance/Repairs and Building Construction
2%
Debt Service
1%
Equipment
.05%

Source: DOC Finance and Accounting

Restitution to Victims
Total paid from FY2002 through FY2011 is $18,998,153.

Fiscal Year
Restitution Paid to Victims
2002
$1,872,859
2003
$1,729,456
2004
$1,943,896
2005
$1,937,104
2006
$1,692,986
2007
$1,853,136
2008
$2,016,553
2009
$1,983,539
2010
$2,197,065
2011
$1,771,559


Following is a summary of the Oklahoma Department of Corrections Fiscal Year 2013 appropriation request.

Priority
Item
Total
A
Pneumatic lock, control panel and electric lock replace
$8,334,480
B
Offender Growth and Per Diem Restoration
$4,423,310
C
Non-Discretionary Increases - Secure Facilities
$2,811,665
D
Non-Discretionary Increases - Medical Services
$4,045,000
E
Efficiency Improvements
$3,410,000
F
Improvements to maintain or increase security
$5,911,600
G
Information Technology/Other Technology Upgrades
$2,115,000

TOTAL REQUESTED APPROPRIATION INCREASE
$31,051,055

REQUESTED FY 2013 APPROPRIATION
$490,882,123



Department of Corrections 2012 Proposed Legislative Initiatives

  1. Clarification of agency’s authorization to sell seized contraband cell phones.
  2. Delete electrocution as an option for carrying out an execution.
  3. Enact legislation to amend process for obtaining or maintaining occupational licensure upon conviction of a felony.
  4. Enact legislation to allow DOC to deduct costs of cremation from offender trust fund if family declines to accept offender remains. 
  5. Expand eligibility for medical parole to offenders serving sentences for 85% crimes.
  6. Updating degree requirements for Director, Deputy Director, Warden, and Probation and Parole Officer.

Contact DOC

Main Location
3400 Martin Luther King Avenue
Oklahoma City, OK 73111-4298


Mailing
PO Box 11400
Oklahoma City, OK  73136-0400


Phone: (405) 425-2500
Fax: (405) 425-2578


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