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Agency-Wide FY2010 Annual Report

Operating Environment

Departmental services are organized into five distinct divisions:

Field Operations includes: Agri-Services; Classification, Population, and Sentence Administration; Female Offender Operations; Institutions; Oklahoma Correctional Industries; Private Prison and Jail Administration; Procedures and Accreditation; and Safety Administration.

Administrative Services includes: Contracts and Acquisitions; Departmental Services; Evaluation and Analysis; Finance and Accounting; Information Technology; Personnel; Quality Assurance; and Training and Staff Development.

Community Corrections includes: Seven community corrections centers; fifteen community work centers; nine halfway house facilities; and six probation and parole districts.

Community Sentencing and Offender Information Services includes: Community Sentencing; Correctional Offender Management Information Tracking (COMIT); and Grants Administration.

Treatment and Rehabilitative Services includes: Medical Services; Mental Health Services; Programs; Religious and Volunteer Services; and Victim Services.

Other administrative units include: Employee Rights and Relations; Executive Communications; Internal Affairs; and General Counsel.



Workforce

The table below illustrates the changes in filled FTE since July 1, 2000.

Department of Corrections Filled FTE History

Fiscal Year
Correctional Officers
Probation/Parole Officers
Medical Staff
Others
2000
2,114
315
351
2,257
2001
2,039
300
400
2,238
2002
2,065
302
394
2,198
2003
1,963
286
379
2,037
2004
1,963
291
383
2,010
2005
1,933
300
384
1,974
2006
2,003
337
369
1,996
2007
2,007
340
366
1,990
2008
2,003
345
386
2,086
2009
1,932
344
372
2,046
2010
1,867
312
355.3
1,815
  • Correctional officers comprised the largest segment of the Oklahoma Department of Corrections workforce as of July 1, 2010. Uniformed staff were 80.8% male with an overall age of 40.5. Non-uniformed staff were 54.6% female with an overall average age of 48.5.
  • By race, the largest percentage of the agency’s workforce is Caucasian (77.9%) followed by Black (9.7%), American Indian (9.4%), Hispanic (2.0%), and Asian (1.0%) as of July 1, 2010.

Overall, the total number of filled positions in Fiscal Year 2010 (4,349) is 349 positions less than the total number of filled positions in Fiscal Year 2009 (4,698), a decrease of 7.4%. In addition to normal turnover in positions, the agency lost staff due to VOBOs and suspension of retention incentives. Because of the budget cuts, according to OPM, correctional officers are the second highest subgroup to separate within the first 24 months on the job for state government, both in percentage and raw totals.

The number of correctional officers employed in Fiscal Year 2010 is less than the number employed in Fiscal Year 2000.  The number of probation and parole officers employed in Fiscal Year 2010 is lower than the previous four years.

Oklahoma Department of Corrections employees have an average 13.8 years to retirement eligibility according to the Fiscal Year 2009 Annual Report and Workforce Summary issued by the Office of Personnel Management. This demographic for corrections has been significantly different for FY 2010 and FY 2011 projections because of recent voluntary retirement buyouts.

Selected Agency
Average Years of Service
Average Years to Retirement Eligibility
Corrections
11.4
13.8
General Safety, Security Inspections, and Investigations
8.5
15.0
Law Enforcement
12.5
15.5
Social Services
11.0
15.3
Classified Employees
11.7
13.2
Unclassified Employees
11.4
12.6


Retirements

The following table provides a history of calendar year employee retirements: 

Calendar Year
Number of Retirements
2000
105
2001
105
2002
129
2003
117
2004
144
2005
114
2006
106
2007
126
2008
161
2009
214
2010

Calendar Year 2010 numbers are through October 31, 2010. 

213


Volunteer Services

The agency’s workforce is supplemented through the use of volunteers. These volunteers serve in many capacities and provide invaluable services to the Oklahoma Department of Corrections. The average number of volunteer hours monthly for Fiscal Year 2010 is 11,362.

National Offender Population

In the latest of an ongoing series of reports on the national state of corrections by The Pew Center on the States, “One in 31”: The Long Reach of American Corrections (March 2009) provides a detailed look at the populations in the states’ corrections system as a whole and details which states have the highest populations of offenders behind bars and in the community.

The principle finding of the report is that 1 in 31 American adults are in prison or jail, or on probation or parole. Twenty-five years ago, the rate was 1 in 77.

Other key findings include:

  • Two-thirds of offenders are in community settings, not behind bars. The report also states 1 in 45 adults is on probation or parole and 1 in 100 is in prison or jail. The proportion of offenders behind bars versus in the community has changed very little over the past 25 years, despite the addition of 1.1 million prison beds.
  • Who is under correctional supervision is highly concentrated by race and gender:
    • 1 in 11 black adults (9.2% of total)
    • 1 in 27 Hispanic adults (3.7% of total)
    • 1 in 45 white adults (2.2% of total)
    • 1 in 18 men (5.5% of total)
    • 1 in 89 women (1.1% of total)

Oklahoma Offender Population

Demographics

Incarcerated Offenders

  • Of the state’s 25,949 incarcerated offenders (which excludes county jail backup), 53.2% are white and 46.8% are non-white.
  • The controlling or major offense of half of Oklahoma’s incarcerated offenders is a non-violent crime. 
  • The average age of incarcerated offenders is 37.4.
  • Compared to the state’s general population, the U.S. Census Bureau reports Caucasians are 71.4% of the state’s population; African Americans represents 8.0% of the state’s population.

Ethnicity of Incarcerated Offenders

Ethnicity
Percentage
Caucasian
53.19%
African American
30.22%
Native American
8.88%
Hispanic
7.18%
Other
.53%


Crime Type of Incarcerated Offenders

Crime Type
Percentages
Violent
50%
Alcohol or Drug-Related
34%
Other, Non-Violent
16%


Gender of Incarcerated Offenders

Gender
Percentage
Male
89.36%
Female
10.64%


Probation and Parole Clients

The majority of the state’s 24,711 probation clients are primarily white and male.

  • The majority of probation clients committed nonviolent crimes.
  • The average age of probation clients is 35.5.

Ethnicity of Probation Clients

Ethnicity
Percentage
Caucasian
61%
African American
21%
Hispanic
8%
Native American
8%
Other
2%


Crime Type of Probation Clients

Crime Type
Percentage
Alcohol or Drug-Related
46%
Other, Non-Violent
32%
Violent
22%


Gender of Probation Clients

Gender
Percentage
Female
23.44%
Male
76.56%


Parole Clients

The majority of the state’s 3,538 parole clients are primarily white and male.

  • The majority of parole clients committed non-violent crimes.
  • The average age of parole clients is 43.6.

Ethnicity of Parole Clients

Ethnicity
Percentage
Caucasian
57%
African American
30%
Hispanic
8%
Native American
4%
Other
1%


Crime Type of Parole Clients

Crime Type
Percentage
Alcohol or Drug-Related
56%
Other, Non-Violent
24%
Violent
20%


Gender of Parole Clients

Gender
Percentage
Male
83.63%
Female
16.37%


Receptions and Releases, Fiscal Year 2002 – Fiscal Year 2010
The following tables show the nine year trend of offender receptions and releases. Receptions are convicted felons taken into custody of the Oklahoma Department of Corrections.

Fiscal Year
Number of Violent Receptions
Number of Non-Violent Receptions
2002
2,136
6,258
2003
2,061
6,171
2004
2,210
6,507
2005
2,288
6,443
2006
2,288
6,137
2007
2,559
6,345
2008
2,553
6,211
2009
2,615
6,092
2010
2,903
6,473


Offender Prison Releases by Release Type, Fiscal Year Comparison - FY 2002 to FY 2010

Fiscal Year
Parole
Split Sentence-Probation
Street
2002
1,975
2,516
3,568
2003
1,712
2,705
3,598
2004
2,238
2,656
3,476
2005
1,655
3,064
3,404
2006
1,106
3,253
3,566
2007
1,105
3,160
3,832
2008
1,257
3,113
4,118
2009
1,117
3,338
4,232
2010
760
3,440
4,350


The table below shows the comparison of the state’s offender population with receptions and releases.

Offender Population: Incarcerated, Receptions and Releases - FY 2003 to FY 2010
Note: Population numbers are based on Department of Corrections Weekly Population Analysis, and the receptions and releases are based on data extracted from the Offender Management System.

Fiscal Year
Population
Receptions
Releases
2003
23,006
8,232
8,015
2004
23,221
8,717
8,370
2005
23,948
8,731
8,123
2006
24,376
8,425
7,925
2007
25,023
8,904
8,097
2008
25,297
8,764
8,488
2009
25,200
8,707
8,687
2010
25,935
9,376
8,550


Although annual new receptions and releases had started converging in recent years, FY 2010 saw a sharp divergence resulting in a larger overall incarcerated population for that year.

The following table shows yearly offender incarceration growth trends since July 2000. It does not include offenders sentenced to probation or other sanctions. “Out and Community Programs” includes offenders in hospitals, in transit to courts, GPS and other electronic monitoring, and other community programs.

Yearly Offender Growth Trends

Fiscal Year
Total Sentenced Offenders
DOC Facilities
Contract Beds
Out and Community Programs
2000
22,621
15,184
6,985
452
2001
22,798
15,018
7,317
463
2002
22,918
15,478
7,067
373
2003
23,006
16,231
6,405
370
2004
23,221
16,592
6,196
433
2005
23,948
17,127
6,174
647
2006
24,376
17,096
6,454
826
2007
25,023
17,697
6,501
825
2008
25,297
17,903
6,530
864
2009
25,200
18,248
6,089
863
2010
25,935
18,336
6,534
1,065


Offenders sentenced to Life without Parole represent 2.7% of the total offender population. 

FY 2010 Incarcerated Offenders with Life Without Parole Controlling Offense Types

Controlling Offense
Number
Percentage
Violent
690
94%
Non-Violent
46
6%
Overall
736
100%


County Jail Backup

  • Offenders sentenced by the court to the Oklahoma Department of Corrections are housed in county jails until actual reception into department custody.

    Financial responsibility for offender housing costs shifts from the county to the Oklahoma Department of Corrections upon court sentencing.

    The daily charge to the Department by the counties for this service is set by statute and is currently set at $27 plus all medical costs.
  • The following table illustrates the jail backup bed growth since the end of FY 2000. The number of offenders as part of the county jail backup population has been trending upwards since FY 2000.
Fiscal Year
Jail Backup Count Population
2000
637
2001
707
2002
629
2003
1,108
2004
1,303
2005
1,166
2006
1,536
2007
1,181
2008
1,323
2009
1,542
2010
1,348


Contract Bed Space

  • Oklahoma began contracting for private prison bed space with Oklahoma private prison facilities in April 1996.
  • Currently three private facilities in this state have contracts to provide maximum and medium security beds to the Oklahoma Department of Corrections.
  • The increased use of contract prison beds to accommodate net offender growth has resulted in expenditure growth beyond the agency’s appropriated resources. To meet this cost growth, numerous facility infrastructure, technology, vehicle replacements, programmatic and staffing needs have been chronically deferred, reduced in scope, or reallocated.

Private Prison Expenditures FY 2004 to FY 2010 

Fiscal Year
Private Prison Expenditures
2004
$57,473,196
2005
$58,495,084
2006
$59,996,536
2007
$69,349,198
2008
$78,025,259
2009
$77,715,564
2010
$76,693,152

Note: In April 2007, the Oklahoma Department of Corrections was evicted from Great Plains Correctional Facility (not shown above), resulting in 804 offenders being moved elsewhere.

Offender Work Programs

  • The Department of Corrections has two enterprise operations, Agri-Services and Oklahoma Correctional Industries, which employ incarcerated offenders.
  • Agri-Services plays a vital role in enabling offenders to learn valuable job skills and work ethics that can benefit them upon release. Collectively, Department of Corrections Agri-Services farm operations total 25,585 acres where livestock production and management, along with farm management skills, are taught by qualified farm managers. Agri-Services farm operations maintain a herd of over 3,500 beef cattle and 412 head of dairy cattle for meat and milk production to support feeding of offenders. Agri-Services produces grass hay and alfalfa hay, wheat, and other small grains to
    supplement the winter-feeding of livestock.
  • Agri-Services also operate facilities to process meat and vegetables that are ultimately used for offender meals.

Agri-Services Total Sales

FY 2006
FY 2007
FY 2008
FY 2009
FY 2010
$8,106,967
$8,572,415
$10,345,533
$10,172,154
$9,490,614


Oklahoma Correctional Industries operates production facilities at a number of institutions, offering customers quality products at reasonable prices while reducing offender idleness and providing job skills training. This results in significant overall tax savings to the general public. The five largest product lines are license tags and plates, garment operations, modular office systems, upholstered furniture and metal fabrication.

Correctional Industries Total Sales

FY 2006
FY 2007
FY 2008
FY 2009
FY 2010
$15,733,376.32
$19,167,296
$16,165,452
$19,741,891
$14,810,400


The table shown below shows the number of offenders employed in these enterprise operations.

Number of Offenders Employed in Enterprise Operations

Fiscal Year
Oklahoma Correctional Industries
Agri-Services
2005
1,024
466
2006
1,041
448
2007
1,156
410
2008
1,002
372
2009
1,009
376
2010
1,168
338

Offender Treatment Programs

  • Research indicates that, if offenders are taught new skills and behaviors, recidivism is reduced. The department only utilizes programs that are evidence-based in reducing recidivism.

    Several types of programs are offered to offenders at all prisons in the system. The table below summarizes program participation.
  • Substance abuse programs utilize cognitive behavioral modalities to address drug addiction and abuse behaviors. Program durations are from four months to one year in duration based on facility location and individual progress in treatment.
  • Phase I and the Sex Offender Psycho-Education Program (SOPEP) are both offered to motivate offenders to seek treatment services upon release. Both Phase I and SOPEP are offered by DOC mental health professionals.
  • Educational Services to include General Equivalency Diploma, Adult Basic Education, Literacy, and Life Skills classes are available across all levels of security.
  • Thinking for a Change classes are offered at multiple facilities and security levels. This curriculum teaches offenders how to restructure their thinking so their behavior is positively impacted.
  • The state’s current economic crisis has resulted in a reduction or elimination of several substance abuse treatment programs. To date 295 male treatment slots and 40 female treatment slots have been eliminated (335 total). Both sex offender treatment programs ceased operation in March 2010.
  • Based on recent survival analysis studies performed by the Evaluation and Analysis Unit, it was found that offenders who completed an approved substance abuse treatment program reduced their chances of returning to prison by 20% compared to a matched sample of offenders who did not complete the program. These findings are statistically
    significant and demonstrate that effective programming can reduce recidivism rates. Overall, the recidivism rate in FY2010 for offenders released 36 months earlier was 23.4%.
  • This survival analysis compares the percentage of offenders who have not returned to custody of the Oklahoma Department of Corrections within 36 months to a control group of released offenders who did not receive treatment.

FY 2010 Program Participation

Program
Participants
Substance Abuse Treatment
2,935
Sex Offender Psycho-Educational Program/Phase I
250
Sex Offender Treatment*
47
Thinking for a Change
4,118
Moral Reconation Therapy
388
Literacy
2,263
Adult Basic Education
2,325
General Equivalency Diploma
4,306
Life Skills
1,694
Faith and Character Community
608


Program Impact on Returning Offenders, FY2001 to FY2007

Treatment Group
Return Rate for Treatment Group
Time period for these treatment groups is July 1, 2002 to December 31, 2007.
Return Rate for Matched Sample
Time period for these treatment groups is July 1, 2002 to December 31, 2007.
Percent Difference
Male - Substance Abuse Treatment Graduates
18.51
33.14
14.63
Female - Substance Abuse Treatment Graduates
13.51
26.30
12.79
Female - Adult Basic Education Graduates
Return Rate for Treatment Group is defined as the percentage of offenders who received the treatment program specified and returned to the custody of the Department of Corrections within 36 months of release. Return Rate for Matched Sample is defined as the percentage of offenders who did not receive the treatment program specified and returned to the custody of the Department of Corrections within 36 months of release.
2.21
20.22
18.01
Male - Adult Basic Education Graduates
Return Rate for Treatment Group is defined as the percentage of offenders who received the treatment program specified and returned to the custody of the Department of Corrections within 36 months of release. Return Rate for Matched Sample is defined as the percentage of offenders who did not receive the treatment program specified and returned to the custody of the Department of Corrections within 36 months of release.
10.12
32.59
22.47
Female - Literacy Graduates
Return Rate for Treatment Group is defined as the percentage of offenders who received the treatment program specified and returned to the custody of the Department of Corrections within 36 months of release. Return Rate for Matched Sample is defined as the percentage of offenders who did not receive the treatment program specified and returned to the custody of the Department of Corrections within 36 months of release.
8.84
22.15
13.31
Male - Literacy Graduates
Return Rate for Treatment Group is defined as the percentage of offenders who received the treatment program specified and returned to the custody of the Department of Corrections within 36 months of release. Return Rate for Matched Sample is defined as the percentage of offenders who did not receive the treatment program specified and returned to the custody of the Department of Corrections within 36 months of release.
10.21
31.89
20.65


Probation and Parole

  • The following tables present a statistical overview of offenders in probation and parole for Fiscal Year 2009 and Fiscal Year 2010.
  • Probation revocations accounted for 25.0% of FY 2010 receptions. Of these, 12.8% were received without a new case and 1,141 (12.2%) were received into prison with a new case. Some probation violators may have been probationers supervised by an agency other than the department. Parole violators constituted 1.2% of all FY 2010 receptions.

Revocations

Revocations
FY2009
FY2010
Difference
Technical/Absconders (Offenders who have committed technical violations of their supervision)
443
309
-30.2%
Law Violations
1,021
1,028
+.6%
Specialty Courts (Drug Court and Mental Health Court) These figures reflect only those offenders supervised by the Department of Corrections. 
241
142
-41.1%
Total
1,705
1,479
-13.3%


Employment

Fiscal Year
Percentage
FY2009
79%
FY2010
78%
Difference
-1.1%


Specific Populations

Medical

  • A 2008 Urban Institute Report on Offender Re-entry Health has documented the poor health status of offenders entering prisons as compared with the general population. Offender populations are also aging due to longer prison sentences.
    This circumstance is often made worse by offender’s tendency for unhealthy lifestyles, coupled with a history of substance abuse or other chronic medical conditions.

    The offender population 50 years and older in the Oklahoma Department of Corrections has grown from 85 in 1980 to over 3,700 in Fiscal Year 2010.

Offender Population 50 Years of Age and Older

Year
50 and Older
Total Population
Percentage of Total Offender Population
1980
85
1,746
4.9%
1994
879
13,689
6.4%
2010
3,952
27,283
14.5%

Note: Does not include out-count population. Data for 1980 and 1994 from Wheeler, et al., 1995. Data for 2010 from Oklahoma Department of Corrections Offender Management System.

  • The projected population aged 50 years or older is expected to be 5,254 by Fiscal Year 2013, a 48% increase, while the overall offender population is expected to grow 10%.
  • Oklahoma Department of Corrections health care expenditures demonstrate consistent growth, reflecting the national trend.
  • Factors increasing the cost of offender health care include: Increased offender population, increased average age of offenders, market-driven increases in salaries and benefits of health care personnel, and increased costs of non-
    Department of Corrections physician and hospital services.

    Less tangible factors affecting costs include: Improved overall quality of care, compliance with community standards of care, and the evolution of medical technology.

Offender Health Care Expenditures - Daily

Fiscal Year
Expenditures Daily
2000
$5.23
2001
$5.71
2002
$6.04
2003
$6.14
2004
$6.67
2005
$7.20
2006
$7.80
2007
$7.94
2008
$7.97
2009
$7.40
2010
$7.04


Mental Health

  • The closure of state mental health hospital beds continue to impact the increasing number and percentage of offenders with serious mental illness who enter the state prisons. One indicator of this increase is the fact that the number of offenders incarcerated in DOC increased 20% from FY1998 to FY2010, while the number of incarcerated offenders requiring psychotropic medications increased 292%. Approximately 6,500 of the 25,949 incarcerated offenders have been diagnosed with a serious mental health problem and approximately 5,000 require and consent to psychotropic medications. The chart below is another dramatic picture of the fact that significant decreases in the rate of citizens committed to state mental health hospitals occurred at the same time the incarceration rate has significantly increased.

Per-Capita Imprisonment Versus Mental Hospital Commitment, 1960 to 2010

Year
Offenders per 100,000
Patients per 100,000
1960
121
274
1970
143
127
1980
152
46
1990
384
22
2000
657
12
2005
676
10
2010
655
4

Source: Oklahoma Criminal Justice Resource Center

  • The Oklahoma Department of Corrections and the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) collaborative Mental Health Reentry Program transitions incarcerated offenders with serious
    mental illness into appropriate community based mental health services in the community. Reentry Intensive Care Coordination Teams (RICCTs) are under ODMHSAS contracts to be responsible for engaging with the offender with
    serious mental illness prior to discharge and then working with them in the community until they are fully participating in the appropriate community based mental health and substance abuse services.
Mental Health Services (FY2010 Actuals)
Offenders
Number of Offenders Discharged through Integrated Service Discharge Managers
188
Number of Offenders Provided Reentry through RICCTs
155
Number of Incarcerated Offenders Provided Enhanced Integrated Co-Occurring Treatment Services
429

Female Offenders

  • Oklahoma has consistently ranked first in the rate of female incarceration nationally, and projections for the female offender population through Fiscal Year 2013 indicate that ranking will remain high.
  • The steady, small increases in female offender numbers reflect reception and release patterns that have stayed consistent in recent years. Overall, the reception numbers have remained slightly larger than the releases in the period.
  • The following chart illustrates the increasing number of female offenders:

Female Offender Population Actual and Projected through FY 2013

Fiscal Year
Female Offender Population Actual and Projected
2005
2,557
2006
2,608
2007
2,701
2008
2,721
2009
2,649
2010
2,760
2011
2,804
2012
2,849
2013
2,895


Hispanic Offenders

  • The Hispanic/Latino offender population in Oklahoma prisons is the fastest growing racial/ethnic population in the system. While the numbers are not a large proportion of the total offender population at this time, their growth and rate of increase pose definite issues for effective and efficient management of department institutions.
  • The following chart illustrates the increasing number of Hispanic offenders:
Fiscal Year
Hispanic Offender Population Actual and Projected through FY2013
2005
1,185
2006
1,357
2007
1,511
2008
1,721
2009
1,704
2010
1,864
2011
2,050
2012
2,249
2013
2,467


  • For 2010, the US Census Bureau estimates the Hispanic population in Oklahoma to be 8% of the total population. The DOC Hispanic offender population is slightly over 9% of the DOC population. The growth in the DOC Hispanic offender population has grown slightly faster than the growth of the Hispanic population in Oklahoma.

Funding and Expenditures

The National Association of State Budget Officers estimates that states spent a record $51.7 billion on corrections in FY2008, or 1 in every 15 general fund dollars. Adding local, federal and other funding brings the national correctional spending total to $68 billion.

Similarly, the Pew Center for States Report entitled, One in 31: the Long Reach of American Corrections (March 2009) also provided the results of analysis on the cost of current corrections policies.

The Pew Center report states that over the past twenty years, states’ general fund spending on corrections increased by more than 300 percent; a pace that is above those of other fundamental government services such as education, transportation, and public assistance. Only Medicaid spending has grown faster. Nevertheless recidivism rates have remained largely unchanged.

  • The 33 states that provided specific spending data reported spending as much as 22 times more per day to manage offenders in prisons than to supervise offenders in the community. The reported average offender in prison cost was
    $79 per day ($29,000 annual). Whereas, the average cost of managing an offender in the community ranged from $3.42 per day for probationers to $7.47 per day for parolees (about $1,250 to $2,750 annually). In Oklahoma for the
    same period, average offender prison cost ranged from $47.99 per day at community facilities to $64.35 per day for maximum security facilities. Probation and parole daily costs in the period were $2.75 per day.

    The Report went on to state that correctional research shows that strong community supervision programs for lower risk, non-violent offenders cost significantly less than incarceration and can cut recidivism by as much as 30 percent, when appropriately resourced and managed. Diverting these offenders to community supervision programs also frees up prison bed space needed to house violent offenders. This in turn offers the opportunity to free up state spending for pressing public priorities such as transportation and education.

  • The National Conference on State Legislature reports states spent on average 6.0% of their general revenue funds on corrections in fiscal year 2011.

  • Oklahoma’s high costs associated with a high rate of per capita incarceration are reflected in the percentage of general revenue fund expenditure.

  • Although Oklahoma corrections takes a larger share of general revenue funds, the state also has one of the lowest incarceration per diem rates, the result of incarcerating higher percentages of state citizens compared to surrounding
    states.

Corrections as Percentage of Total General Fund Expenditures, FY2008

State
Percentage
New Mexico
4.60%
Kansas
5.60%
Missouri
6.80%
Arkansas
8.00%
Oklahoma
7.00%
Texas
6.80%
Colorado
8.60%


FY 2010 Actual Expenditures by Expenditure Type

Expenditure Type
Percentage
Salaries and Benefits
55%
Private Prisons and Contracts
26%
Other
Other Expenditures-Over 1 Million: Merchandise for Resale (OCI / Agri-Services); Outside Medical Care; Offender Pay; Rent Expense; Production, Safety and Security; Shop Expense; General Operating Expenses Under 1 Million: Travel Agency Direct Payments; Incentive Payments; Travel reimbursements; Lease Purchasing; Library Equipment-Resources; Land; Livestock and Poultry; Employee reimbursements (Non-Travel); Payments to Local Government; Reimbursement
7%
Food/Supplies and Materials
5.5%
Utilities / Administration
3%
Maintenance / Repairs and Building Construction
2%
Debt Service
1%
Equipment
0.5%


Restitution to Victims

  • The following table provides a breakdown of restitution fees paid to victims since fiscal year 2001.
Fiscal Year
Restitution Paid to Victims
2001
$1,664,569
2002
$1,872,859
2003
$1,729,456
2004
$1,943,896
2005
$1,937,104
2006
$1,692,986
2007
$1,853,136
2008
$2,016,553
2009
$1,983,539
2010
$2,197,065
Total
$18,891,163


Following is a summary of the Oklahoma Department of Corrections Fiscal Year 2012 appropriation request.

Priority
Item
Total
A
Correctional Officer Pay Adjustment of 5%
$3.7 million
B
Retention Initiatives – Master Sergeant
$1.8 million
C
Funding for Staffing Adjustments
$2.4 million
D
Offender Growth
$21.3 million
E
Budget Restorations
$10.8 million
F
Cost Increases
$7.2 million
G
Security Requirements
$13.4 million
H
Minor Capital Outlay and Infrastructure
$7.6 million
I
Equipment Needs
$11.0 Million
J
Information Technology/Other Tech. Upgrades
$4.2 million
K
Realignment of Projects/Programs
$6.4 million

TOTAL REQUESTED APPROPRIATION INCREASE
$89.8 million

REQUESTED FY 2012 APPROPRIATION
$551.9 million


2011 Proposed Legislative Initiatives

  1. Create a process whereby sentencing changes can be analyzed for impact on agency costs and allow time for appropriations to reflect these costs.
  2. Provide a method for agency to finance needed major maintenance or major equipment needs.
  3. Expand two tier offender medical fee structure (Network/Medicaid) to include outpatient medical care providers (current statute applies to inpatient care).
  4. Clarify eligibility for Delayed Sentencing Program by specifically listing eligible offense description and statute citation.
  5. Repeal statute that allows only North Fork Correctional Facility in Sayre to house inmates not allowed in other private facilities (sex offenders, escapees, riot history).
  6. Modify statute on offender achievement credits to include award of credits for successful completion of an Associate’s Degree and a Bachelor’s degree.
  7. Clarify OCI and Agri-Services guidelines for state agencies and OCI and Agri-Services exemptions from Central Purchasing Act.
  8. Expand Community Sentencing eligibility.
  9. Modify the drug protocol used in the execution process and maintaining confidentiality of the identity of persons participating or administering the execution process.
  10. Modify eligibility criteria for offender participation in Electronic Monitoring Program.

Contact DOC

Main Location
3400 Martin Luther King Avenue
Oklahoma City, OK 73111-4298


Mailing
PO Box 11400
Oklahoma City, OK  73136-0400


Phone: (405) 425-2500
Fax: (405) 425-2578


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