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Agency-Wide FY2014 Annual Report

Oklahoma Department of Corrections

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The Oklahoma Department of Corrections (ODOC) is an agency of the state of Oklahoma. ODOC is responsible for the administration of the state prison system. It has its headquarters in Oklahoma City.

The ODOC is governed by the seven-member Board of Corrections. All members are appointed by the Governor of Oklahoma, with the approval of the Oklahoma Senate, to serve six-year terms. Each of Oklahoma's five Congressional districts is represented by at least one member on the Board, with the remaining two members being appointed from the State at-large. The Board is responsible for setting the policies of the ODOC, approving the annual budget request and for appointing the director of Corrections. The Director, Mr. Robert Patton, who serves at the pleasure of the Board, is the chief executive of the ODOC. 

The ODOC was established in 1967.


Facility and Community Locations during FY2014

Institutions West

William S. Key Correctional Center 
Ft. Supply, Oklahoma

Bill Johnson Correctional Center
Alva, Oklahoma

James Crabtree Correctional Center
Helena, Oklahoma

John Lilley Correctional Center
Boley, Oklahoma

Lexington Correctional Center
Lexington Assessment and Reception Center
Lexington, Oklahoma

Oklahoma State Reformatory
Granite, Oklahoma

Institutions East

Howard McLeod Correctional Center 
Atoka, Oklahoma

Mack Alford Correctional Center 
Stringtown, Oklahoma

Jackie Brannon Correctional Center
McAlester, Oklahoma

Oklahoma State Penitentiary
McAlester, Oklahoma

Jim E. Hamilton Correctional Center
Hodgen, Oklahoma

Joseph Harp Correctional Center
Lexington, Oklahoma

Mabel Bassett Correctional Center
McLoud, Oklahoma

Jess Dunn Correctional Center
Taft, Oklahoma

Eddie Warrior Correctional Center
Taft, Oklahoma

Dick Conner Correctional Center
Hominy, Oklahoma

Northeast Oklahoma Correctional Center
Vinita, Oklahoma

Community Correction Centers

Enid Community Corrections Center
Enid, Oklahoma

Clara Waters Community Corrections Center
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Oklahoma City Community Corrections Center
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Kate Barnard Community Corrections Center
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Union City Community Corrections Center
Union City, Oklahoma

Lawton Community Corrections Center
Lawton, Oklahoma

Community Work Centers

Beaver Community Work Center
Beaver, Oklahoma

Sayre Community Work Center 
Sayre, Oklahoma

Mangum Community Work Center 
Mangum, Oklahoma

Hollis Community Work Center 
Hollis, Oklahoma

Elk City Community Work Center 
Elk City, Oklahoma

Hobart Community Work Center 
Hobart, Oklahoma

Altus Community Work Center 
Altus, Oklahoma

Frederick Community Work Center 
Frederick, Oklahoma 

Walters Community Work Center 
Walters, Oklahoma

Waurika Community Work Center
Waurika, Oklahoma

Healdton Community Work Center
Healdton, Oklahoma

Ardmore Community Work Center
Ardmore, Oklahoma

Madill Community Work Center
Madill, Oklahoma

Idabel Community Work Center 
Idabel, Oklahoma

Holdenville Community Work Center
Holdenville, Oklahoma 

Probation and Parole Districts

Central District Office
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Northeast District Office
Muskogee, Oklahoma

Northwest District Office
Enid, Oklahoma

Southeast District Office
McAlester, Oklahoma

Southwest District Office
Lawton, Oklahoma

Tulsa County District Office
Tulsa, Oklahoma


Workforce

Correctional officers comprised the largest segment of the ODOC workforce as of June 30, 2014. Correctional officer staff were 80.28% male with an average age of 39.7. Non-correctional officer staff were 59.2% female with an average age of 48.6.

By race, the largest percentage of the agency’s workforce is Caucasian (77.57%), followed by Black (9.94%), American Indian (9.07%), Hispanic (2.45%) and Asian (0.97%) as of June 30, 2014. 

Overall, the total number of filled positions at the end of Fiscal Year 2014 (3,924) was 27 positions more than the total number of filled positions at year end Fiscal Year 2013 (3,897).

Department of Corrections Filled FTE History

Fiscal Year
Correctional Officers
Probation/ Parole Officers
Medical Staff
Others
2005
1,933
300
384
1,974
2006
2,003
337
369
1,996
2007
2,007
340
366
1,990
2008
2,003
345
386
2,086
2009
1,932
344
372
2,046
2010
1,867
312
355
1,815
2011
1,761
281
374
1,638
2012
1,673
276
383
1,617
2013
1,596
281
376
1,644
2014
1,590
283
369
1,682


Retirements

FY2010 and FY2011 included voluntary buyouts.

Fiscal Year
Number of Retirements
2007
92
2008
150
2009
155
2010
221
2011
255
2012
103
2013
145
2014
135


Religious Services and Volunteer-Led Activities

Activities
FY2013
FY2014
Number of religious services (average per month)
1,699
1,835
Number of volunteer hours provided for religious services
(average per month)
7,817
8,504
Number of volunteer activities, other than religious services (average per month)
478
639
Number of volunteer hours provided for volunteer activities other than religious services (average per month)
2,353
2,582

Oklahoma Offender Population

Demographics as of June 30, 2014

Incarcerated Offenders

Of the state’s 28,182 incarcerated offenders (which excludes county jail backup), 54.6% are white and 45.4% are non-white. 

The controlling or major offense of half of Oklahoma’s incarcerated offenders is a non-violent crime.

The average age of incarcerated offenders is 38.1.

Violent vs. Non-Violent by Controlling Offense

Controlling Offense
Number of Offenders
Percent of Offenders
Violent
13,607
48.3%
Alcohol Related
698
2.5%
Other Non-Violent
6,515
23.1%
Drug Related
7,362
26.1%
Overall
28,182

Incarcerated Offenders by Gender

Chart showing Incarcerated offenders by gender is 10.6% female and 89.4% male.







Incarcerated Offenders by Race

Race
Number of Offenders
Percent of Offenders
African-American
7,477
26.5%
Caucasian
15,384
54.6%
Hispanic
2,153
7.6%
Native American
3,009
10.7%
Other
159
0.6%
Overall
28,182


Probation Clients

The majority of the state’s 21,586 probation clients are primarily white and male. The majority of probation clients committed non-violent crimes.

The average age of probation clients is 36.1.

Violent vs. Non-Violent by Controlling Offense

Controlling Offense
Number of Offenders
Percent of Offenders
Violent
5,258
24.4%
Alcohol Related
1,582
7.3%
Other Non-Violent
7,387
34.2%
Drug Related
7,359
34.1%
Overall
21,586


Probation Clients by Gender

Probation Clients by gender are 24% female and 76% male.

Probation Clients by Race

Race
Number of Offenders
Percent of Offenders
African-American
4,005
18.6%
Caucasian
13,287
61.5%
Hispanic
1,794
8.3%
Native American
1,792
8.3%
Other
708
3.3%
Overall
21,586


Parole Clients

The majority of the state’s 3,204 parole clients are primarily white and male. 

The majority of parole clients committed non-violent crimes. 

The average age of parole clients is 45.1.

Violent vs. Non-Violent by Controlling Offense

Controlling Offense
Number of Offenders
Percent of Offenders
Violent
597
18.6%
Alcohol Related
39
1.2%
Other Non-Violent
679
21.2%
Drug Related
1,889
59%
Overall
3,204


Parole Clients by Gender

Parole Clients by gender are 14.5 percent female and 85.5 percent male.

Parole Clients by Race

Race
Number of Offenders
Percent of Offenders
African-American
1,018
31.8%
Caucasian
1,652
51.6%
Hispanic
286
8.9%
Native American
191
5.9%
Other
57
1.8%
Overall
3,204


Receptions and Releases, Fiscal Year 2005 – Fiscal Year 2014 

The following tables show the 10 year trend of offender receptions and releases. Receptions are convicted felons taken into custody of the ODOC. 

Fiscal Year
Violent
Non-Violent
Overall  
2005
2,030
6,701
8,731
2006
2,042
6,383
8,425
2007
2,260
6,644
8,904
2008
2,278
6,486
8,764
2009
2,334
6,373
8,707
2010
2,607
6,769
9,376
2011
2,342
6,014
8,356
2012
2,355
6,259
8,614
2013
2,277
6,132
8,409
2014
3,064
7,656
10,720


Offender Prison Releases by Release Type

Fiscal Year
Paroled
Probation
Street
Overall
2005
1,655
3,064
3,404
8,123
2006
1,106
3,253
3,566
7,925
2007
1,105
3,160
3,832
8,097
2008
1,257
3,113
4,118
8,488
2009
1,117
3,338
4,232
8,687
2010
760
3,440
4,350
8,550
2011
636
3,489
4,615
8,740
2012
497
3,371
4,257
8,125
2013
576
3,040
4,025
7,641
2014
1,039
3,450
4,469
8,958


Offender Population: Incarcerated, Receptions and Releases

Fiscal Year
Population
Receptions
Releases
2005
23,948
8,731
8,123
2006
24,376
8,425
7,925
2007
25,023
8,904
8,097
2008
25,297
8,764
8,488
2009
25,200
8,707
8,687
2010
25,935
9,376
8,550
2011
25,458
8,356
8,740
2012
25,869
8,614
8,125
2013
26,553
8,409
7,641
2014
28,161
10,720
8,958


The table below illustrates yearly offender incarceration growth trends since July 2004. It does not include offenders sentenced to probation or other non-incarceration sentences. 

Yearly Offender Growth Trends

Fiscal Year
Total Sentenced Offenders
ODOC Facilities
Contract Beds
Backup County Jails
Out Count and Community Programs
2005
23,948
17,127
6,174
1,166
647
2006
24,376
17,096
6,454
1,536
826
2007
25,023
17,697
6,501
1,181
825
2008
25,297
17,903
6,530
1,323
864
2009
25,200
18,248
6,089
1,542
863
2010
25,935
18,336
6,534
1,348
1,065
2011
25,458
18,027
6,324
1,323
1,107
2012
25,869
18,106
6,420
1,561
1,343
2013
26,553
17,902
7,312
1,646
1,339
2014
28,161
19,198
7,676
163
1,287


Offenders sentenced to Life Without Parole represent 2.9% of the total offender population.

Chart showing Life Without Parole Non-violent is 6.5 percent and violent is 93.5 percent.

Chart shows offenders sentenced to life are 4.7 percent non violent and 95.3 percent violent.

Chart shows offenders serving over 50 years are 88.6 percent violent and 11.4 percent non-violent

County Jail Backup

Offenders sentenced by the court to the ODOC are housed in county jails until reception into ODOC custody. 

Financial responsibility for offender housing costs shifts from the county to the ODOC upon court sentencing.

The daily charge to the Department by the counties for offenders housed in county jails is set by statute and is currently set at $27 per day.

Fiscal Years
Backup County Jails
2005
1,166
2006
1,536
2007
1,181
2008
1,323
2009
1,542
2010
1,348
2011
1,323
2012
1,561
2013
1,646
2014
163


Contract Bed Space

Oklahoma began contracting for private prison bed space in April 1996. 

Currently three private facilities in this state have contracts to provide maximum and medium security beds to the ODOC. The agency has contracts with 11 halfway houses for residential services. 

The increased use of contract prison beds to accommodate net offender growth has resulted in expenditure growth beyond the agency’s appropriated resources. To meet this cost growth, numerous facility infrastructure, technology, vehicle replacements, programmatic and staffing needs have been chronically deferred, reduced in scope or reallocated.

Expenditures reflect actual amounts billed and paid to the vendors. 

Fiscal Year
Private Prison Expenditures
2005
$71,073,507
2006
$72,673,043
2007
$77,082,338
2008
$78,246,556
2009
$77,715,501
2010
$74,693,152
2011
$72,310,996
2012
$72,889,227
2013
$79,285,938
2014
$92,211,827


Fiscal Year
Halfway House Expenditures
2005
$15,002,233
2006
$14,789,952
2007
$15,604,734
2008
$17,486,676
2009
$17,138,799
2010
$16,465,865
2011
$16,733,511
2012
$14,941,393
2013
$15,574,689
2014
$15,459,472



Offender Treatment Programs

The Program Services Unit oversees the delivery of quality programs that address offender needs in an effort to prepare offenders for reentry and ultimately reduce recidivism. The Program Services unit coordinates delivery of education, vocational training, cognitive restructuring, and substance abuse programming.

Educational opportunities are available at all levels of security and offer Literacy for offenders who are assessed with an overall accomplishment below the sixth grade level; Adult Basic Education for those who indicate an overall accomplishment between the sixth and ninth grade levels; and General Educational Development to prepare offenders indicating an overall accomplishment at or above the ninth grade level with no high school diploma. A total of 1,670 GED certificates were obtained by offenders in FY2014.

Substance abuse treatment programs utilize a cognitive behavioral modality of delivery to address addiction and abuse. Treatment programs are from four to twelve months in duration depending on the individualized needs of the offender. Participation data is collected and analyzed to ensure the effectiveness of treatment programming. Participants totaled 1,993 in treatment with 931 successfully completing in FY2014.

Cognitive Restructuring programs address criminal thought processes and are designed to instill values and promote positive changes in behavior. These programs are available at most facilities and offer participants the opportunity to scrutinize their behavior patterns through identifying thinking errors and triggers to criminal behavior.

Several forms of programming is offered to offenders at all facilities within the agency. The table below summarizes program participation.

FY2014 Program Participation

Program
Participation
Substance Abuse Treatment
1,993
Thinking for a Change
2,178
Literacy
1,802
Adult Basic Education
2,151
General Equivalency Diploma
2,263
CIMC Life Skills
2,413
Faith and Character Community
446


Probation and Parole

Probation revocations accounted for 26% of FY2014 receptions. Of the offenders who were received on a probation revocation, 56% were received into prison without a new case and 44% were received with a new case. Some probation violators may have been probationers supervised by an agency other than the ODOC. Parole violators constituted .8% of all FY2014 receptions.

Specific Populations

Medical

A 2008 Urban Institute Report on Offender Reentry Health has documented the poor health status of offenders entering prisons as compared with the general population. Offender populations are aging due to longer prison sentences. This circumstance is often made worse by offender’s tendency for unhealthy lifestyles, coupled with a history of substance abuse or other chronic medical conditions.

The incarcerated offender population 50 years and older in ODOC has grown from 85 in 1980 to over 5,120 in FY2014.

  • ODOC health care expenditures demonstrate consistent growth, reflecting the national trend. 
  • Factors increasing the cost of offender health care include: Increased offender population, increased average age of offenders, market-driven increases in salaries and benefits of health care personnel, and increased medication costs of non-ODOC physician and hospital services. 

Less tangible factors affecting costs include: Improved overall quality of care, compliance with community standards of care, and the evolution of medical technology and medication costs. The chart below illustrates ODOC health care expenditures have increased from $60,800,591 in FY2005 to over $84,000,000 in FY2014.

Offender Population 50 Years of Age and Older
Data for 1980 and 1994 from Wheeler, et al., 1995. Data for 2010-present are generated using end-of-fiscal year data and only exclude offenders on escapee status.

Year
50 and Older
1980
85
1994
879
2010
4,064
2011
4,179
2012
4,417
2013
4,729
2014
5,120


Offender Health Care Expenditures
For FY2014 Offender Health Care Expenditures includes ODOC housed offenders and contract beds. 

Fiscal Year
Expenditures
2005
$60,800,591
2006
$66,728,472
2007
$69,127,448
2008
$70,697,766
2009
$65,891,931
2010
$63,113,309
2011
$62,692,267
2012
$65,090,992
2013
$68,718,612
2014
$84,411,263

Offender Health Care Expenditures - Daily

Fiscal Year
Daily Expenditure
2005
$7.20
2006
$7.80
2007
$7.94
2008
$7.97
2009
$7.40
2010
$7.04
2011
$7.01
2012
$7.35
2013
$7.58
2014
$9.02


Mental Health

Offenders with mental health problems continue to be increasingly overrepresented in the ODOC populations compared to the community. No offenders were excluded from this analysis. Based on incarcerated population on June 30, 2014. 

FY 2014 Prison Population
Number
Percentage

History or current symptoms of a mental illness: 

16,092
57%

Current symptoms of a mental illness: 

9,432
33%

Current serious developmental or cognitive disability: 

301
1%


FY2006 through FY2014 Changed in Psychotropic Medication Distribution
From FY2006 through FY 2014, the number of offenders on psychotropic medications increased from 4,072 to 6,343, a 56% increase. 

Data comes from Mental Health Services and are based on end of the fiscal year population counts of offenders receiving psychotropic medication, both at private and public facilities. During the time frame, the percentage of offenders on these medications increased by 56%, while the general population increased by 15%. General population includes offenders housed in all locations, with the exception of those supervised by GPS/EMP technology, Interstate Compact - OUT and offenders on escapee status. 

Fiscal Year
Number of Offenders on Psychotropic Medications
2006
4,072
2007
4,279
2008
4,917
2009
4,894
2010
5,160
2011
6,146
2012
6,061
2013
6,248
2014
6,343


The ODOC and the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) collaborative Mental Health Reentry Program transitions incarcerated offenders with serious mental illness into appropriate community-based mental health services in the community. Reentry Intensive Care Coordination Teams (RICCTs) are under ODMHSAS contracts to be responsible for engaging with the offender with serious mental illness prior to discharge and then working with them in the community until they are fully participating in the appropriate community-based mental health and substance abuse services.

The table below summarizes the FY2013 and FY2014 average monthly number of mental health services.

Mental Health Services Activities
Services for FY2013
Services for FY2014
Offenders in Group Sessions
1,158
851
Number of Group Sessions
230
176
Number of Individual Therapy Sessions
3,335
2,951
Offenders Seen for Psychotropic Medication Management
2,829
2,689
Crisis Interventions
900
1,200
Staff Consultations
1,239
936


Number of Offenders Served Fiscal Year

Services
FY2013
FY2014
Integrated Service Discharge Managers
256
313
Reentry Intensive Care Coordination Teams
207
237
Enhanced Integrated Co-Occurring Treatment Services
225
276


An outcome analysis of the program that was performed by ODMHSAS showed continued positive results. Outcomes of offenders served during FY2014 were compared with a baseline group comprised of similar individuals.

Collaborative Mental Health Reentry Program (2014)

Outcome Measure
Baseline
The baseline comparison group was comprised of similar individuals prior to program implementation (2006)
RICCT
Inpatient Hospitalizations
8.7%
0.9%
Outpatient Service Utilization
55.1%
78.5%
Rate of Engagement in Community Based Services
11.7%
64.3%
Offenders Engaged in Medicaid 90 Days Post Release
14.5%
42.1%
Offenders Returning to Prison within 36 Months
42.3%
24.6%


Female Offenders

Oklahoma has consistently ranked first in the rate of female incarceration nationally, and projections for the female offender population through FY2014 indicate that ranking will continue. The steady, small increases in female offender numbers reflect reception and release patterns that have stayed
consistent in recent years. The table on the right illustrates the increasing number of female offenders.

FY05-FY06 numbers come from the closest population analysis report to the end of the fiscal year. These numbers include all ODOC facilities, contract locations, and incarcerated offenders supervised by electronic monitoring, but exclude offenders that are temporarily on the OUT count status (e.g., hospital, court, jail). FY07-present generated from the Offender Management System (OMS) and include all ODOC facilities, contract locations, incarcerated offenders supervised by electronic monitoring,

Fiscal Year
Female
Percent Increase
2005
2,475
--
2006
2,458
-0.7%
2007
2,566
4.2%
2008
2,690
4.6%
2009
2,649
-1.5%
2010
2,670
0.8%
2011
2,606
-2.5%
2012
2,648
1.6%
2013
2,702
2.0%
2014
2,979
9.3%

Hispanic Offenders
The Hispanic offender population in Oklahoma prisons is the fastest growing racial/ethnic population in the system. While the numbers are not a large proportion of the total offender population at this time, their growth and rate of increase pose definite issues for effective and efficient management of department institutions. 

For 2011, the U.S. Census Bureau estimates the Hispanic population in Oklahoma to be 8.9% of the total population. The ODOC Hispanic offender population is 7.6% of the ODOC incarcerated population. 

The table below illustrates the increasing number of Hispanic offenders.

Numbers generated from the Offender Management System (OMS) and include all ODOC facilities, contract locations, and incarcerated offenders under probation and parole supervision (i.e., GPS/EMP), as well as offender that are temporarily on the OUT count status (e.g., hospital, court, jail).

Fiscal Year
Hispanics
Percent Increase
2005
1,185
--
2006
1,357
12.7%
2007
1,511
10.2%
2008
1,721
12.2%
2009
1,704
-1.0%
2010
1,864
8.6%
2011
1,918
2.8%
2012
1,972
2.7%
2013
2,048
3.7%
2014
2,153
4.9%


National Funding and Expenditure Trends

National Association of State Budget Officers, State Expenditure Report (Fiscal 2012-2014)

In fiscal 2013, corrections spending represented 3.2% of total state spending and 6.9% of general fund spending. General fund dollars are the primary source for state corrections and account for $47.4 billion, or 88.9% of all fiscal 2013 state corrections spending. State funds (general funds and other state funds combined, but excluding bonds) accounted for 97.7% of total state corrections spending in fiscal 2013. Federal funds accounted for 1.4% and bonds accounted for 1.0%. Federal
funds for corrections declined by 25.5% in fiscal year 2013, as American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds expired. 

State spending on corrections in fiscal 2014 is estimated to total $55.5 billion, a 4.0% increase from fiscal year 2013. State funds are estimated to increase by 4.0% while federal funds are estimated to increase by 4.3%. The slight increase in the overall growth rate is partly due to recent efforts states have taken to control corrections spending. State spending for corrections totaled $53.3 billion in fiscal 2013, compared to $53.1 billion in fiscal 2012, a 0.5% increase. Over the past several years, states have begun targeting criminal justice reforms to address the cost drivers of corrections expenditures. 

The same report also documented expenditures for Oklahoma in fiscal 2013. Oklahoma corrections expenditures were 2.6% of total state spending and 6.6% of total state general fund spending. According to the report, the state’s corrections expenditures totaled $563 million in fiscal 2013. 

The state general fund is the dominant source of the state’s corrections spending for fiscal 2013, providing 81.5%, of total monies spent in corrections. This percentage is considerably lower than the national average of general fund support reported for the same year 88.9%.

Fiscal 2013 state general fund and other state funds made up 99.6% of total corrections spending. This percentage for Oklahoma was higher than the national average of 97.6%. 

In contrast, fiscal 2013 federal funds accounted for only 0.4% of the total monies spent in corrections. This level of federal funds was below the national average 1.4% reported for the same fiscal year.*

Oklahoma’s high costs associated with a high rate of per capita incarceration are reflected in the percentage of general revenue fund expenditures. 

Although Oklahoma corrections takes a larger share of general revenue funds, the state has one of
the lowest incarceration per diem rates, compared to surrounding states.

Corrections as Percentage of Total General Fund Expenditures, FY2014
Arkansas is 8.2 percent
Colorado is 8.0 percent
Missouri is 7.2 percent
Oklahoma is 6.7 percent
Texas is 6.6 percent
Kansas is 5.8 percent
New Mexico is 4.6% percent

Source: National Association of State Budget Officers: State Expenditure Report (Fiscal Year 2012-
2014 Data)

Appropriations

Comprehensive Annual Financial Report Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2013

Appropriation
FY2013
FY2014
Appropriation
$463,731,068
$463,731,068
Percent change prior year
.8 percent
-
Supplemental
-
$13,000,000
Total State Appropriation
$6,828,000,000
$7,083,000,000




The following provides a breakdown of FY2014 actual expenditures by expenditure type for the ODOC. 

Salaries and Benefits $260,161,660
Private Prison and Contracts $157,923,332
Utilities/Admin. $15,218,949
Maint/Repairs and Bldg. Const. $9,992,824
Food $17,743,369
Equipment $4,127,249
Debt Service $5,294,637
Other $59,125,594
Other Expenditures include - Over 1 Million: Merchandise for Resale (OCI and Agri-Services); Outside Medical Care; Offender Pay; Rent Expense; Production, Safety and Security; Shop Expense; General Operating Expenses Under 1 Million: Travel Agency Direct Payments; Incentive Payments; Travel reimbursements; Lease Purchasing; Library Equipment-Resources; Land; Livestock and Poultry; Employee reimbursements (Non-Travel); Payments to Local Government; Reimbursement
Total $529,587,614

Restitution to Victims
The following provides a breakdown of restitution fees paid to victims since Fiscal Year 2005.

Fiscal Year
Restitution Paid to Victims
2005
$1,937,104
2006
$1,692,986
2007
$1,853,136
2008
$2,016,553
2009
$1,983,539
2010
$2,197,065
2011
$1,771,559
2012
$1,354,355
2013
$1,270,299
2014
$1,143,689


FY2014 Legislative Summary

An Act relating to prisons and reformatories; amending 57 O.S. 2011, Section 561.1, as amended by Section 256, Chapter 304, O.S.L. 2012 (57 O.S. Supp. 2013, Section 561.1), which relates to private prison contractors; clarifying requirements for determining daily costs of inmates; and providing an effective date.

SB2131 - An Act relating to state employee compensation; providing for salary increases for certain state employees. 

SB2126 - An Act relating to the Department of Corrections; making an appropriation; stating purpose; amending 57 O.S. 2011, Section 541, as amended by Section 251, Chapter 304, O.S.L. 2012 (57 O.S. Supp. 2013, Section 541), which relates to the Department of Corrections Industries
Revolving Fund; deleting spending restriction; adding requirement of Director’s approval; making appropriation nonfiscal; and declaring an emergency.

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